sad pug dog food recall died

Evanger’s Dog Food Blamed in Deadly Dog Food Poisoning; One Dog Died, Three Others in ICU

A New Year’s Eve celebration turned deadly when four dogs became gravely ill immediately after being fed Evanger’s Dog & Cat Food Co. canned dog food.

The dog’s owner says she fed a can of Evanger’s Hunk of Beef with Au Jus dog food to her four pugs and within minutes, they were all sick. The pug’s owner explains:

“I fed them one can, and within fifteen minutes, they were acting drunk, walking around. They were falling over. So, I grabbed them all and took them to the emergency vet, and when I got them there, they were limp. They weren’t moving or anything,” she said.

All four dogs went into intensive care, and sadly, one of the dogs later died. Evanger’s donated the full amount ($5,800) on the pet parent’s fundraising page for the dog’s vet bills.

The family took the dead dog’s remains for a necropsy at Oregon State University. There, they hope to find out what killed the dog and made her siblings so sick.

Meanwhile, Evanger’s has not issued a recall, but the company has said it tracked down the lot number of the food the dogs were fed and found it was only distributed in Washington. In a statement on Evanger’s website, they explain:

“The Lot Number is 1816E06HB13…and was manufactured back in June 2016. We traced this batch and found that the entire lot went to one distributor in Washington State, and no other cans from this lot would be anywhere else in the country.  We asked the distributor if they had any product left of this same lot number, and they did not.  An Evanger’s representative contacted all 376 stores that the distributor sells to in order to find out if any product is still on shelves.”

“One store got back to us, and she informed us that the pug owner purchased the cans at her store, and she still had some product on her shelf.  We dispatched FedEx to pick up the remaining cans of the same lot number and had it sent directly to a third-party accredited laboratory for testing yesterday.”

Evanger’s has pledged to take back any product from customers who have concerns, no questions asked.

Related Articles on Poisoned Pets About Evanger’s Dog & Cat Food Co.:

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Mollie Morrissette

Mollie Morrissette, author of Poisoned Pets, is an animal food safety expert and advisor to AAFCO. Help support her work by making a donation today.

Comments (20) Write a comment

  1. This was most likely Xylitol poisoning.. NOTHING else can sicken or kill as quickly .. the hypoglycemia can kill (seizures then death) in as little as 15 minutes. Even Strychnine (rat poison) takes two hours..

    The Pug family’s ETSY page shows them feeding the pugs (human) cakes, cookies and muffins. The dogs’ favourite treat was “Organic Lollipops” .. the same company makes Organic Sugar-Free Lollipops with Xylitol. This sweetener is found in gum, candy, cookies, breath fresheners, cakes and cookies, favoured by diabetics, as well as some Peanut Butters. This incident happened on New Year’s Eve.. a time of indulgence, including our pets.. the family was having a party. Is there a possibility that the visitors to the family’s home could have slipped these dogs “treats”. Maybe with dogs pestering for more treats, the owners decided to feed them their “Hunk of Beef” and not long after the dogs started to act sick?

    Ingredients of Hunk of Beef by the way, are sinply BEEF.. BTW my information and sources are now with the FDA. The owners have NOT been forthcoming with the company, nor with the FDA, despite repeated attempts at contact.. My specialty is Nutritional Biochemistry, and other have backed me up.

    LINK – New findings on the effects of xylitol ingestion in dogs Once thought to cause only hypoglycemia in dogs, this sugar ubstitute has recently been discovered to also produce acute, possibly life-threatening liver disease and coagulopathy. And the number of reported exposures to xylitol has been increasing according to the FDA http://www.aspcapro.org/sites/pro/files/xylitol.pdf

    Reply

    • Caroline: I have the toxicology report – and I am in close contact with the owner Nikki Mael – and she is in daily contact with the FDA. The FDA found an “abundant amount” of sodium pentobarbital in unopened cans of Evanger’s dog food. This has NOTHING to do with xylitol. And pending species identification may tell us it is not beef at all but in fact another euthanized animal. The FDA is currently investigating Evanger’s and is building a criminal case against them as I write this. Stay tuned…

      Reply

  2. Mollie,
    I find it inhumane that you, in my opinion take advantage of mourning pet parents. It is easy for someone grieving a loss to not be thinking clearly making this even more difficult.
    I will have to do more research to find out your take on Hills Science Diet, Purina, Beneful and some of the other foods out there that clearly are crap based on their ingredient panel.
    I’d be interested to read your take on these foods from companies that have clearly battled issues in the court systems based on facts and yet people continue to feed these CHEAP non nutritional foods.
    Based on the degree of diligence that you have gone after Evangers I would hope that you have gone ballistic on these other companies, seems only fair.
    I’d also be curious to know what you feed if indeed you actually have pets of your own.
    Would give a better idea to your readers as to what you believe.

    Reply

    • Why am I “inhumane” in your opinion? Read my website and you will quickly see that all I do is write about is what goes on in the pet food industry. I have already covered the other companies you mention numerous times. Put those companies in the search box (above left) and you will see that I have. If you had read me “about” me page you would know I have clearly dedicated my life to helping animals. I do not receive any financial compensation for doing this work either.

      Reply

  3. Can you please share those lab reports that you have right in front of you? I can’t blindly believe something because it was written and posted on a website. Thanks!

    Reply

    • I will not publish them until I have all the final toxicology reports. What I have are preliminary lab results. Final testing is occurring at another lab at another university at this time.

      Reply

  4. It is believed now that all the dogs were given Xylitol-laced treats by an unknowing owner. This was New Year’s Eve.. there was a photo of one of the dog being given an organic, Xylitol-containing lollipop on her Etsy page.

    Reply

    • Actually, Caroline, the toxicology reports I have in front of me on the dog food in question reveal the dog food tested positive for the euthanizing drug pentobarbital – so much so – that is caused all four dogs to be rendered insensible and one to die. There is irrefutable evidence of this. The FDA is building a criminal case against Evanger’s as we speak. DO NOT feed this food to your pet – it is DEADLY. I don’t know where in the world you came up with this theory, but it is way off the mark. The pug’s owner does not have an Etsy page either. If have this photo please send it to me – I’d love to see it.

      Reply

      • Mollie, I’m not sure what “Test Results” you have, but I have all of the Food Related results and there is No sign of what you claim.
        I also find it weird that out of some 4000+ cans that were made in this batch – how is this the ONLY instance? The ONLY “poisoning” as you claim.
        Do we know for sure that this pup “died” or did they euthinanize to avoid any other discomfort/pain the dog may have been in? I know I would have authorized something similar if it had been my dog.
        I think it would be a wiser decision to gather ALL FACTs before tainting everyone’s view. As there are those out there that will ONLY take your word and WHO ARE YOU? A licensed professional? Somehow I don’t think so.
        Everyone needs to do their homework.
        Unfortunately… They do not and we all know that everyone for whatever reason will BELIEVE All negative before they’ll believe the Truth. Very unfortunate.

        Reply

        • Chris, I have done my homework. Evanger’s did not test for any toxins, chemicals, or pesticides. They only tested for commercial sterility, staph, Salmonella, E. coli, clostridium, and botulinum toxin A/B. The FDA is building a criminal case against Evanger’s as I write this. These are not “claims” – they are facts. I have the lab results to prove it. Pentobarbital comes from pet food companies using inferior pet food ingredients such as euthanized cats, dogs and horses. Or someone at the plant deliberately put the drug in there (which seems unlikely). In terms of reporting adverse events to the FDA, it is well established that many cases are not reported for a number of reasons. The ones that are typically don’t have enough useful information for the FDA to act on. In this case, it was clear: all four dogs became violently ill minutes after consuming the tainted dog food and they had a necropsy, and samples from the owner. BTW, how did you know that only 4000+ cans were in this batch? What makes you think it was only this batch? Evanger’s is co-packer too. It could be in other brands they produce for other manufacturers as well.

          Reply

    • Why? The woman refuses to respond to the company, refuses to give the name of the vet testing the product and refuses to hand over any cans she bought, or the can that made them sick. I find it suspicious that when a company has paid all of your vet bills, and wants to figure out what went wrong with the food so they can perform a recall if necessary and prevent it in the future, you won’t reply? She certainly accepted their donation to the vet bill, so why not help them solve the issue? Clearly there are pieces of this story missing.

      Reply

      • Allen, I am not aware that the victim refused to work with Evangers. It was my understanding that Evangers is having samples from the same lot she fed her dogs tested for “sterility.” Evanger’s does not need a sample of her food because at this point the product (if indeed there was anything left – which I doubt), it would be compromised. Labs like the samples to be from unopened containers only.

        Also, Evanger’s has a long and sordid history of mismanagement, fraud, and criminal behavior – this is not a company I would put any faith in as far as trusting them to be truthful about discovering what is wrong with their pet food. I am not terribly surprised they paid her vet bills, usually, companies will offer to pay if the victim signs a non-disclosure document. Whether that is the case here we will never know.

        My advice to the victim was to have the food tested by a qualified toxicologist specializing in food safety at a university. Additionally, I trust she and her vet reported the incident to the FDA and their state agriculture department which might then choose to test the food themselves.

        Reply

      • Allen,
        So glad there are others asking these same questions.
        The store that sold the original cans to this family actually had a few cans left and sent them all to the company so they could be tested. These were the last remaining cans from this batch.
        I, like you, wish people would get all their info together before forming their opinions and posting for all to see.

        Reply

        • Actually, Chris, they were not all the remaining cans from the batch – the store owner sold a case and half to the pugs owner days after Evanger’s claimed they had the product removed from their client’s inventory. Another customer found the same batch in another store two or three days after Evanger’s claimed they had instructed all product removed from inventory. 2 out of 2 is not a good track record. This leads me to believe that there are/were other stores that still carried the toxic food. I am curious, Chris, how do you know this inside information? Who do you work for?

          Reply

          • I work at a Feed Store with the largest in stock selection of premium pet foods in my county. The distributor that we get our Evangers from did not receive this particular batch. I checked all of our stock personally. The batch we were selling from at the time of this incident was manufactured in Nov. 2016.
            As far as other stores having the “bad” batch in their stores that is on them. All of the communication I have received told us to return all product from this batch for full refund. We even gave credit to customers that returned “anything Evangers”, dry kibble as well as any other cans, not just Hunk-O-Beef.
            As I said in one of my other posts, I will read more about you, your website etc…
            I just find it needless to disparage anyone, anything before all the facts have been received.
            And as for the owners of these pugs going back to the same store and buying the same food again? Some lot info and everything??
            That could be taken a couple of ways… Since I don’t know this to be true, was it done to feed? Because they didn’t believe the food to be tainted? Was it done to send to a lab for testing? I have no idea. But as I said before, that store owner should have removed that product and sent it back to their distributor. That was not not very responsible on that store owners part, if this is fact.

  5. The commercial dog food companies are using euthanized pets in their food from shelters, Vets or wherever. And of course the chemicals they use to euthanize pets are in the dog and cat food. If you love or even just like your pet you need to make homemade food for them. Let’s show the dollar driven pet food industry we will not put up with these deadly products. It will cost you less in the long run with fewer Vet bills. Vets are part of the problem too. The dog food suppliers send them on big vacation trips. So they are not going to say anything negative about commercial food. Plus think about it—fewer sick pets means less money for the Vets. And you can forget about the government helping. They are getting cash under the table. They can’t even regulate our food. Look on the labels. Can you even pronounce all the names of the chemicals? Why do you think we have CANCER everywhere. Chemicals in our food, in our water and in our air. The EPA is useless also. The for profit companies are lining the EPA’s pockets also. It is all about corruption.

    Reply

    • I find this comment to be incredibly ill informed. Some dog food do what you said yes. Working at a holistic pet store that takes the quality of our products seriously I find the fact you have researched nothing very concerning. Evangers is a good company that takes it’s customer satisfaction very seriously. They have made strives to make sure that all of their customers are happy with the food.
      I agree with you on the rest. Companies such as Nestle and Purina, Benniful etc, for buying decent brands and cheapening them up. Blame the vets for lying to the public and telling them foods like Hills and Science diet are good companies, when in fact they are not.
      Which you seem to be pointing out, but also including Evangers in the mix which is unjust.

      Reply

      • Have you read my other articles on Evangers? You might want to before you boldly stand behind such a corrupt company.

        Related Articles on Poisoned Pets About Evanger’s Dog & Cat Food Co.:

        Busted! Owner of Evanger’s arrested on felony charges
        Evanger’s pet food plant smells like sh*t, neighbors say
        Evanger’s food fraud shenanigans thwarted by blogger
        Evanger’s caught in pet food fraud: Plain ol’ beef substituted for duck and lamb
        Dangerous metal tags in Evanger’s dog food: Solution? A silent recall

        Links in article (above).

        Reply

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