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Bailey’s Choice dog treats recalled for Salmonella contamination; expands recall of chicken jerky treats

UPDATE: Bailey’s Choice’s website has posted a cryptic notice about the pet treat recall:

We have received all the final testing from the FDA and GA State Department of Agriculture. We will be releasing a complete update by the end of the day today .

Equally curious, and disturbing, is Bailey’s notice regarding affected lots and expiration dates:

Bailey’s Choice is issuing a voluntary recall of our chicken jerky treats that have two lot dates: June 5, 2013 and August 28, 2013 (Lot #132881). These two lots tested positive for salmonella. We have had no reports of anyone or any pet becoming sick. It is more dangerous to humans

Couple of things: A recall is not voluntary when the food is adulterated. Second, someone has got their lot dates and numbers all screwed up. The original recall involved lot number #132881 with expiration dates of February 2014 and June 2013. However, according to Bailey’s website only lot dates “June 5, 2013 and August 28, 2013 (Lot #132881)” are involved in the recall.

Personally, I would go by what the state department of Georgia is reporting (see below).

Bailey’s Choice expands product recall of dog treats in Georgia

Georgia Agriculture Commissioner is alerting consumers to the expanded recall of particular packages of Bailey’s Choice dog treats sold in Georgia. These products have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.

Bailey’s Choice Dog Treats is expanding the recall to include additional 5 oz. packages of dog treats, including:

  • 100% Chicken Treat, lot # “Jun 2 2013”
  • 100% Chicken Treat, lot # “Jun 3 2013”
  • 100% Chicken Breast Treat, lot # “Jun 4 2013”
  • 100% Chicken Treat, lot # “Jun 15 2013”
  • 100% Chicken Treat, lot # “Jul 8 2013”
  • 100% Chicken Treat, lot # “Jul 11 2013”
  • 100% Teriyaki Chicken Treats, lot # 132881

Georgia Department of Agriculture inspectors will continue checking retail stores and warehouses to make sure the recalled products have been removed from sale.

Salmonellosis in dogs

Dogs that have become infected by consuming treats contaminated with Salmonella may experience fever, lethargy, diarrhea or mucus in stool, vomiting, dehydration, weight loss or rapid heart rate. Pets experiencing these symptoms should be taken to a veterinarian immediately. This bacterial disease is zoonotic, meaning it can be transmitted to humans.

Symptoms in humans

Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea that may be bloody, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses, such as arterial infections, endocarditis and arthritis. The very young, the elderly, and persons with compromised immune systems are most susceptible to foodborne illnesses. People experiencing these symptoms should seek immediate medical attention.

Consumers who purchased these products for their pets should return the products to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions should contact Bailey’s Choice Dog Treats for additional information at (770) 881-0526, thomdo4570@gmail.com or at www.baileyschoicetreats.com.

To see the previous recall announcement issued by the Georgia Department of Agriculture, please visit: www.agr.georgia.gov/georgia-pet-treats-recalled-for-potential-health-risk.aspx. If this recall expands again or additional details become available, Poisoned Pets will provide up-to-date information.

SOURCE: Georgia State Department of Agriculture Press Release

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Mollie Morrissette

Mollie Morrissette, author of Poisoned Pets, is an animal food safety expert and advisor to AAFCO. Help support her work by making a donation today.

Comments (3) Write a comment

  1. Pingback: Recall of Bailey's Choice jerky dog treats for Salmonella contamination - Poisoned Pets

  2. This company posted the wrong dates on its website, and hasn’t corrected that error or posted an update since. If it weren’t for this site, the information would not be “out there.” The company states that “all products are independently tested”: by whom? If that were so, why didn’t their “independent testers” discover the issue? Perhaps they mean that the “independent tester” is the state dept. of agriculture?

    The company’s website makes the false declaration: “these treats will not harm your dog,” which is simply not true. Many people overuse these treats and chronic exposure can lead to chronic infection, (then regarded as a disease, leading to pronounced fever, weight loss, blood loss, non-intestinal infections, and repeated unpredictable/ spontaneous diarrhea that can last for weeks). If its not treated, the infection can progress to septicemia (bacterial infection of the blood), which can be fatal. It’s simply wrong to make statements that this is not potentially harmful.

    So much for buying treats made in the US.

    Reply

    • Their testing methods (if they had them) were obviously inadequate or it wouldn’t have taken the state of Giorgia to find the Salmonella.

      What utter BS – the treats will not harm you pet? Puleeze. If that is their take they have no business being in the pet food business.

      They haven’t updated their website? OMG. That is ridiculous. Thanks for pointing that our Peter. I’ll go and check on that. That is unforgivably irresponsible.

      No one said US mfgs were immune to sloppy standards. It happens all over the world – China just seems to have developed it into a fine art. They are the masters of food fraud.

      Reply

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