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Ol’ Roy Dog Food Withdrawn For Deadly Drug Contamination; Pentobarbital Found In Canned Dog Food

Today, we learn of yet another national brand of dog food was found to contain the lethal euthanizing drug sodium pentobarbital: Walmart’s brand Ol’ Roy canned dog food. Walmart, the nation’s largest retailer, is now in the process of quietly removing it from all 4,700 stores across America.

At this point, we do not know which Ol’ Roy formulas are affected. There is no information on Walmart’s recall page about the Ol’ Roy pet food withdrawal, nor has Walmart made a public announcement.

This latest discovery was made during an investigation by ABC7 News into pentobarbital-laced pet food following the Evanger’s debacle. This news follows days after the revelation that several other Big Heart Brand dog foods also tested positive for the drug. After ABC7 releasing the results of lab tests that identified the drug, the FDA launched an investigation.

FOUR BRANDS + MULTIPLE VARIETIES NAMED

Yesterday, we learned that in addition to today’s news about Walmart’s Ol’ Roy canned dog food, that Big Heart Pet Brand’s Kibbles n’ Bits, Gravy Train and Skippy brand canned dog foods also tested positive for the deadly drug – a drug commonly used to euthanize pets. The news prompted a notice for a nationwide withdrawal of the tainted pet food in which retailers were instructed to pull the tainted dog food from their stores and destroy the product.

The number of brands of dogs found to contain the deadly drug, since the investigation began, has risen steadily to include today’s count of nine varieties of Gravy Train canned dog foods, seven varieties of Kibbles n’ Bits canned dog foods, and one variety of Skippy canned dog food.

GRAVY TRAIN’S DENIAL OF RESPONSIBILITY

On Gravy Train’s website, there is a notice in regards the discovery of pentobarbital laced dog food, which they refer to as a “claim.” They claim that the products only contain what they describe as “extremely low levels of pentobarbital” and therefore “do not pose a threat to pet safety” admitting only that they are “disappointed that pentobarbital was introduced to our supply chain.”

Instead of taking responsibility for their failure to follow strict auditing practices, they point the blame on a “single supplier.” Curiously, they also claim that none of their foods contain “euthanized animals or pets” in their pet food, nor do their foods contain “3D or 4D meat such as dead, dying, disabled, or diseased animals.”

BIG HEART BRAND’S EMPIRE OF NATIONAL BRANDS

Big Heart Brands manufacturers an enormous amount of branded – and private label – dry and wet pet food, and pet snacks under the Meow Mix, Milk-Bone, Kibbles ‘n Bits, 9Lives, Natural Balance, Pup-Peroni, Gravy Train, Nature’s Recipe, Canine Carry Outs, Milo’s Kitchen, Reward, Pounce, Cycle, Morris, Jerky Treats, Amore, Meaty Bone, Alley Cat, Snausages, Tartar Check, Flavor Snacks, GravyBones, Super Supper, Ham & Cheesers, Steak & Cheesers, Surf n’ Turf, Farm Stand Selects, Growing Years, Snaw Somes!, Marosnacks, Wholesome Goodness, Plus Care, Bold Meaty Satisfaction!, Acatemy, Combo Bites, Let’s Play, Carribean Catch, Chew-lotta, Pawfections, Kitten Lil’ Nibbles, in addition to many, many other brand names.

Unfortunately, as Big Heart Pet Brands also produces and distributes a number of private label pet products we cannot know which private label brands may also be contaminated with pentobarbital.

GRAVY TRAIN CONTAMINATED PRODUCT

Item Name UPC Item Code(s)
Gravy Train 13.2 oz. with T-Bone Flavor Chunks 7910052541
Gravy Train 13.2 oz. with Beef Strips 7910052542
Gravy Train 13.2 oz. with Lamb and Rice Chunks 7910052543
Gravy Train 22 oz. with Chicken Chunks 7910051645
Gravy Train 22 oz. with Beef Chunks 7910051647
Gravy Train 13.2 oz. with Beef Chunks 7910034417
Gravy Train 13.2 oz. with Chicken Chunks 7910034418
Gravy Train 13.2 oz. Chunks in Gravy Stew 7910051933
Gravy Train 13.2 oz. Chicken, Beef & Liver Medley 7910051934
Gravy Train 13.2 oz. Chunks in Gravy with Beef Chunks 7910034417

KIBBLES ‘N BITS CONTAMINATED PRODUCT

Item Name UPC Item Code(s)
Kibbles ‘N Bits 13.2 oz. Burger Bacon Cheese and Turkey Bacon Vegetable Variety 12-Pack 79100103777910010378
Kibbles ‘N Bits 13.2 oz. Beef, Chicken, Vegetable, Meatball Pasta and Turkey Bacon Vegetable Var. Pack 79100103827910048367
7910010378
Kibbles ‘N Bits 13.2 oz. Beef, Chicken, Vegetable, Burger Bacon Cheese and Beef Vegetable Variety Pack 79100103807910010377
7910010375
Kibbles ‘N Bits 13.2 oz. Wet Variety Pack 79100103757910048367
Kibbles ‘N Bits 13.2 oz. Chef’s Choice Bistro Tender Cuts with Real Beef & Vegetable in Gravy 79100103757910048367
Kibbles ‘N Bits Chef’s Choice Homestyle Tender Slices with Real Beef, Chicken & Vegetables in Gravy 7910010380
Kibbles ‘N Bits Chef’s Choice Bistro Tender Cuts with Real Turkey, Bacon & Vegetable in Gravy 7910010378

THE COMPLETE LIST OF AFFECTED PET FOODS

Pulled-Dog-Foods

WHICH BRANDS ARE NEXT?

As more Big Heart Brands pet foods are discovered to contain the deadly drug, it is possible – and based on emerging information and the lack of quality control – that other Big Heart brands may also contain material from the same supplier that supplied them with the pentobarbital-laced meat. Therefore, it would wise to avoid feeding your pet any Big Heart pet food brands until an investigation into the matter is complete.

UTTER + MISERABLE FAILURE

What consumers want to know is why did Smucker’s fail to have adequate safeguards in place to prevent this tragedy from occurring? How did one of the nations largest maker of pet food fail so utterly and miserably at auditing their suppliers and testing their ingredients that allowed a deadly drug (which can only come from euthanized animals) to slip into their pet foods?

WHO TO CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

For more information about all the affected pet foods, contact Big Heart Brand’s corporate website.

For additional information about the Kibbles ‘n Bits affected product go here. If you have questions, please call them at 800-828-9980 or email them here.

For more information contact Gravy Train at 800-828-9980 or via email here.

To find out how to report a problem with a pet food contact the FDA.

RELATED NEWS ON POISONED PETS

Deadly Drug Found in Dog Food; Smucker’s Gravy Train Contaminated with Pentobarbital, February 9, 2018

Lawsuit Filed Against Maker of Deadly Drug-Laced Dog Food; Big Heart Brand Gravy Train Dog Food Named in Suit, February 13, 2018

Big Heart Brands Recalls Multiple Brands of Dog Food For Pentobarbital; Gravy Train, Kibbles n’ Bits, and Skippy Dog Food Withdrawn, February 18, 2018

 

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Mollie Morrissette

Mollie Morrissette, author of Poisoned Pets, is an animal food safety expert and advisor to AAFCO. Help support her work by making a donation today.

Comments (136) Write a comment

  1. Unbeliviable :( How it is possible at US? Use hermospet.com it is more healthier because it is simple and GMO free…

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  2. I use a prescription by my vet. It is science diet but for digestive system and can only get this one from the vet’s office. Is science diet though .would this one be ok

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    • You might want to read my latest posts about Hill’s. Your dog might be better off with human edible pet food. I imagine his tummy is upset because the ingredients in Science Diet don’t agree with him. I don’t know. It’s hard to say. And I am not your vet.

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    • I have heard that a Science Diet special recipe food purchased from a vet’s office killed someone’s dog. I would not use what you bought until you can verify that the lot number is not tainted. I have ten dogs. I am going to have to start making my own food for them. This is terrifying.

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    • Ha! That’s a good one. I wish. No, I pay for my pet food from Honest Kitchen just like the rest of you – with my own money. I pay $195 a month in cat food (for my six cats) that I can ill afford. Let’s put it this way, if I were sponsored I could pay to have my car fixed. And I could put an end to the humiliation of begging for donations. That would be nice, but I’m not a sell-out. I simply believe it is the best pet food on the market. People ask me and I’m going to tell them what I feed my own cats.

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  3. DATE YOUR ARTICLES. Judging by the dates of the comments this story is over a year old, but readers have no way of knowing because you have failed to provide the minimum information needed.

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  4. this news is saddening and sickeningly vile! absolutely imperative to those pet owners to know these criminals are using corpses filled with euthanasia chemicals!!!

    This warning effects so many fur babies. so many low income pet-owners are out there who have no choice to buy the cheapest feed because they barely have for themselves. some people buy it to use, like community pet feeders on a budget or low income.
    Sounds like the meat in this cheap dog food come from the dead corpses of recently euthanized dogs and cats from county shelters and vets. refridgerated, collected and sold in bulk.. they pay them to cremate but look what happens!!! SHAME!

    disgusting! they dont care about DOGS OR LIFE! you cant when youre feeding them death!! fouler than involuntary canibalism. glad i dont use this but i have occassionally used them! never again!

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    • Yes, it is very sad. While no one can say for certain that the source of the pentobarbital was from euthanized dogs and cats, it is my suspicion that it was probably from euthanized horses. Unless species analysis is conducted we can never be sure. It would be in the companies best interest to do so to allay the fear that consumers have that their pet’s food could contain the rendered remains of dogs and cats. Or indeed of horses.

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      • Animal digest can contain any animal including roadkill. Most are probably livestock but they also render in pets from shelters, labs, etc. and possibly from vets. It depends on how the vet disposes of carcasses.

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  5. Really wish this article was DATED, so we know if it’s a recent event or one from a year ago.

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    • The article is dated February 15, 2018.

      To answer your question as to the timeliness of the article I would say this: I would suspect any rendered product – whether used a year ago or in a pet food today – of having a great many things I object to including the possibility of pentobarbital contamination.

      Read any one of the multitudes of articles I have written on the subject of rendering. I am not a fan.

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  6. I’m worried now, I have 3 english bullies and feed them blue buffalo, is it ok to feed??

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    • They’ve been having recalls in the past,I don’t trust blue Buffalo,I’d try nature’s balance. I get mine at Petco, salmon,sweet potato,small bites as I have small dogs,I’ve not seen any recalls on this brand.

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    • Yes that’s a good brand. 4 Health from tractor store is very good. Strain free

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  7. I have a 12 year old whippet who is a picky eater (all five of the whippets I’ve had have been picky eaters, some more than others). I was feeding him the Kirkland (Costco) brand Chicken and Rice dog food but on a Whippet Facebook group discussing feeding raw vs grain free vs home cooked vs commercial kibble, the advice I got was to feed ProPlan 30/20. What do you think of the Purina brand dog foods?

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    • I’m not a fan of ProPlan. I would rather see you feed your babies a human-edible pet food make with whole foods. One that comes to mind is the Honest Kitchen (no affiliation). But there are a few others. Just stay away from kibble type dog foods. They are too highly processed in my opinion. I hope that helps!

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    • Purina is garbage too
      Get a good brand food from the dog food or pet store
      It’s so worth it
      The other garbage causes way too many health problems 😢

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    • I have been feeding my Whippets the Proplan Focus Lamb and rice small bites for 4 years now. The dogs have been doing fabulous on it. And no recalls.

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    • I have been a Purina fan for over 50 years, never a problem with it, check for recalls and you will find you may not find any. I adopt senior and hospice dogs and they do very good with Purina one smart blend.

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      • I use Purina Beyond, salmon plus. My dogs are doing fine that I know of.
        My question is what is wrong with Milk Bone treats?

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        • Read the ingredient list: Wheat Flour, Wheat Bran, Meat and Bone Meal, Milk, Wheat Germ, Beef Fat (Preserved with BHA), Salt, Natural Flavor, etc., etc.

          Milk Bones are the nutritional equivalent of Cheerios. But worse, because the ingredients are not fit for human consumption and are animal feed grade ingredients that can mean the ingredients are of poor quality.

          It’s not a product I would ever feed to a dog.

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          • Try mini carrots, mini rice cakes, or just got to the health food store and look around for some mini-sized whole grain crackers. Or you can make your own doggie biscuits using whole grains, bran, nut flours, sesame seeds, raisins…you name it – it’s super easy! And fun!

  8. When did you originally write this? Putting a date on it is important for all . Thank you

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      • It would help if you dated them at the top. I have relatives who bever read all the way to the end and who are posting this like it’s happening right now! How do new readers know your writing style of posting at the bottom?

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          • Because that’s human nature! People will repost without having ever read the original source article. I can’t tell you how many times I have read an article before reposting only to find that it’s outdated. Yes, it’s irresponsible, but the majority of people out there can’t be bothered to fact check before hitting ‘share’.

      • Thank you for your intelligent comments here in this thread. I feed my rescue dogs air dried beef from ziwi peaks it’s expensive but they love it. I also mix in real veggies from the crisper and they eat carrots kale and other geeens.

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  9. Im so glad that my buddies are on a complete raw diet. Agrree that even raw diet is not that healthy. But atkeast they are way much better from this processed foodmcans which contains all sorta chemicals and preservatives. Best is to make home made food for the lil buddies. There safety is our no 1 priority.

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  10. From what I read milk-bone is ok. I hope no pet dies from this. I have recently lost a loved 14 year old pet and would have went crazy if it was because of drugged pet food. I now have a new puppy that i treat like a queen. She loves milk bone treats but will have nothing to do with ol Roy. Maybe she is smarter than we are?

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    • Look at the ingredients of Milk Bone. It’s garbage. It’s the nutritional equivelant of Cheerios for dogs, but worse because it is a pet treat made to pet food ingredients made to pet food manufacturing standards – not human edible standards. Try a healthy – human edible snack – vegetables, fruit, a little peanut butter on a human edible low-sodium cracker. Or better yet, make your own treats. If you really want to buy them I recommend a brand like the Honest Kitchen.

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  11. Here’s the issue. When money was not an issue, my four large dogs all got either home made food or the best of the raw diet foods. But as a retired person where money is an issue, I have to use the best possible food that I can afford. I subscribed to all the helpful newsletters and made a choice. I still have four large dogs. If someone can provide information on how to economically make my own dog food I would appreciate it. I live in a rural area with no butcher shops.

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    • Hi Sharon, I recommend Dr. Lisa Pierson (https://catinfo.org/making-cat-food/#Dogs) and Dr. Jean Hofve (https://littlebigcat.com/nutrition/easy-homemade-diets-for-cats-and-dogs/) for fabulous advice on how to make homemade pet food. It can be done economically!

      I also live in a rural area and I can usually afford to buy farm fresh free range organic eggs from a local farmer.

      Butchers, sadly, are a thing of the past and even the local livestock farmers here do not slaughter and dress their own animals – they are sent to a separate facility for hours away to do that – so no offal for cats or dogs I’m afraid. What I do buy is their human-edible liver and hearts from these local farmers. They are typically sold at the health food store and the farmer’s market. You could look into that.

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  12. A Look Inside a Rendering Plant
    1996;

    Rendering has been called “the silent industry.” Each year in the US, 286 rendering plants quietly dispose of more than 12.5 million tons of dead animals, fat and meat wastes. As the public relations watchdog newsletter PR Watch observes, renderers “are thankful that most people remain blissfully unaware of their existence.”

    When City Paper reporter Van Smith visited Baltimore’s Valley Proteins rendering plant last summer, he found that the “hoggers” (the large vats used to grind and filter animal tissues prior to deep-fat frying) held an eclectic mix of body parts ranging from “dead dogs, cats, raccoons, possums, deer, foxes [and] snakes” to a “baby circus elephant” and the remains of Bozeman, a Police Department quarterhorse that “died in the line of duty.”

    In an average month, Baltimore’s pound hands over 1,824 dead animals to Valley Proteins. Last year, the plant transformed 150 millions pounds of decaying flesh and kitchen grease into 80 million pounds of commercial meat and bone meal, tallow and yellow grease. Thirty years ago, most of the renderer’s wastes came from small markets and slaughterhouses. Today, thanks to the proliferation of fast-food restaurants, nearly half the “raw material” is kitchen grease and frying oil.

    Recycling dead pets and wildlife into animal food is “a very small part of the business that we don’t like to advertise,” Valley Proteins’ president J. J. Smith told City Paper. The plant processes these animals as a “public service, not for profit,” Smith said, since ”there is not a lot of protein and fat [on pets]…, just a lot of hair you have to deal with somehow.”

    According to the City Paper, Valley Proteins “sells inedible animal parts and rendered material to Alpo, Heinz and Ralston-Purina.” Valley Proteins insists that it does not sell “dead-pet byproducts” to pet food firms since “they are all very sensitive to the recycled pet potential.” Valley Proteins maintains two production lines — one for clean meat and bones and a second line for dead pets and wildlife. However, Smith reported, “the protein material is a mix from both production lines. Thus the meat and bone meal made at the plant includes materials from pets and wildlife, and about five percent of that product goes to dry-pet-food manufacturers….”

    A 1991 USDA report states that, “approximately 7.9 billion pounds of meat and bone meal, blood meal and feather meal [were] produced in 1983.” Of that amount, 34 percent was used in pet food, 34 percent in poultry feed, 20 percent in pig food and ten percent in beef and dairy cattle feed.

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) carried in pig and chicken-laden foods eventually may eclipse the threat of “Mad Cow Disease.” The risk of household pet-exposure to TSE from contaminated pet food is more than three times greater than the risk for hamburger-eating humans.

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    • I am very familiar with Van Smith’s article. Even though it is dated, it is still mostly true today. Rendering is a necessary evil and a by-product of our meat consuming society. Most cities do not have crematoriums. To my knowledge, cats and dogs are rendered only at independent renderers which do not typically sell their product to any reputable pet food manufacturer. There is too much risk involved for the pet food manufacturer. Anyone can test their product for traces of pentobarbital and if it comes back positive the company is finished. The independent renderers I spoke to told me that they sell their product to the companies that make fertilizer or fish feed that is used in Asia to feed fish raised on fish farms. Think about that the next time you eat fish.

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      • “To my knowledge, cats and dogs are rendered only at independent renderers which do not typically sell their product to any reputable pet food manufacturer. ”

        True I guess, BUT read the part where the owner of Valley proteins while stating there were two separate lines;

        “…one for clean meat and bones and a second line for dead pets and wildlife. However, Smith reported, “the protein material is a mix from both production lines. Thus the meat and bone meal made at the plant includes materials from pets and wildlife, and about five percent of that product goes to dry-pet-food manufacturers….”

        So while he kept the processing separate, in hte end the “protein material”- the meat and bone meal came from BOTH lines and about 5% of that went to pet food manufacturers.

        “the independent renderers I spoke to told me that they sell their product to the companies that make fertilizer or fish feed that is used in Asia to feed fish raised on fish farms. Think about that the next time you eat fish.”

        Fertilizer is used on American farms too, it would not surprise me in the least some of that winds up on farm fields here. I don’t eat fish but I get your point.

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        • I am very familiar with Valley Proteins. They have the contract with LA county to dispose of the pets from animal shelters.

          It is my fervent hope that pet food companies avoid buying rendered pets for fear of the discovery of sodium pentobarbital in their product. But do they? Yes. As evidence by the Smucker’s, Evangers, and Ol’ Roy recent scandals of the discovery of pentobarbital in their pet food. They claim it comes from euthanized cattle, pigs and/or chickens. Consumers don’t believe it, nor should they.

          But, we can hope that everytime there is a new scandal it makes the pet food industry that much more cautious. It seems only reasonable considering the economic impact of a such a discovery.

          Yes, fertilizers are used on most crops grown today. To my knowledge no one is testing fertilizer for pentobarbital. I feel another scandal brewing…And a lot more reading to do. The USDA has a number of articles on the subject of fertilization of crops.

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  13. Informative and dissapointing! If anyone is looking for a homemade alternative but unsure what the appropriate nutrition needs to be I used ‘Canine Life’ which is a base that you mix with your protein and veg from a recommended list and then bake. Very successful with my 13 year old girl.

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      • I have been using frisky canned food particularly in the salmon and white fish categories

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    • These dog foods are NEVER okay. Read the ingredient panel, do your research. They’re disgusting. Have been for years!

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    • I’ve been feeding the multi generation family owned Fromm dry food after reading and a lot of research, including the dogfoodadvisor site reviews. It is the ONLY pet food compay that NEVER had a recall until last year with one variety of canned food that had more vitamin D in it than it should have.
      Never any recalls for ecoli, listeria, slamonella, plastic contamination, toxic mold, or anything else.
      The alternative is cook it all yourself, but in my case with four St Bernards and working full time that ISNT going to happen! I have had dogs who lived to be 13 years old, VERY few issues of any kind, in fact one I have is now 12 years and 1 month old, the only health issue she’s had is some front teeth needed to be removed.

      Of all the feeds out there I trust Fromm, I have fed IAMS, Show results and many other premium brands over the years, but this one is I feel at the top.

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        • Well then I guess if you are going to run me down and slam me for feeding my dogs anything other than home made steaks- I have nothing further to add and I’m unsubscribing, I’ll continue feeding the Fromm, bye!

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          • I’m sorry you feel that way. But, I do not recommend Fromm. I prefer a human-edible pet food. And I did not suggest steaks. Not many people have the time, and the resources to make a home made diet. That’s why I seldom make that recommendation. For people who can do that for their babies I think it’s wonderful. You cook for yourself why not cook for your fur kids – if you can?

  14. Would you please read the article. It’s not phenobarbital, it’s pentobarbital! There is a difference! One is a euthanasia drug another a sedative.

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    • Either one should not be in pet food ! Why do they have to add drugs to pet food ? This is why I make a lot of my pet food and when I buy pet food it is from a reliable pet food store. Too much preservatives in most pet food !

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      • Pet food manufacturers do not intentionally add the drug it is introduced into the market by renderers who accept animals that were euthanized using pentobarbital. Pet food companies unwittingly buy the meat meal or animal fat and do not test the ingredients for drugs. Ultimately, it is the manufacturer’s responsibility to do so. When they don’t these things happen.

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        • Well, just the ones people have suggested so far. But, yes, you have a point. Unfortunately, most commercial pet food on the market is not something I feel comfortable recommending; Which is why I won’t do “pet food reviews”, there are only a handful of companies that meet my standards. And even those companies make mistakes.

          Ideally, I would like to see people make their own food for their pets. I believe if people can cook for their family they can cook for their furkids.

          My disapproval of most pet food suggestions is a not an overstatement. It is not born of prejudice but of knowledge about what is legally allowed to be in pet food. Indeed, if you knew what I do, you would wonder why I recommend any of them.

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          • What do you ha e to say about Merrick brand? I have a German wire haired pointer who is an allergy pup, he does well on the limited ingredient grain free chicken variety. He is 2 with no signs of allergy now that we got him squared away on much better ( in my opinion) food.

          • Well, I really hate to say because I haven’t researched that brand.

            But in general, I’m not a fan of traditional pet food. What I mean to say is that pet food contains feed grade ingredients and pet food is made to feed grade standards and regulations. Whereas a human food grade/pet food is held to an entirely different set of standards and laws.

            That is why I always recommend human edible pet food. And yes, they do exist. Just make sure it is made in a human food facility otherwise it’s probably just be marketing baloney.

            I hope I’ve answered your question. Let me know if you need more help! :)

      • My tuxedo cat I’m about 8 years old has been diagnosed with bladder stones. The vet suggested Royal Canin urinary tract can food and suggested this may crystallize the stones. First Heidi devoured it and is now shying away from it a bit and has had a tendency to throw up quite often and they are not hairballs just regurgitated food

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  15. This article states that the drug can only come from euthanasized animals. This is wrong. If that is the case how does my dog take phenobarbital daily to control his epilepsy

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  16. Phenobarbital is a sedative…only in extremely large dosages is it used in euthanasia. I am not saying that ANY amount is acceptable in pet food, I’m just saying that the article is misleading when it says that phenobarbital is a death drug.

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    • Sodium pentobarbital is the drug used to euthanize pets. If the drug is found in a pet food it can cause significant health problems and death in pets. Pets have become seriously ill and some have died from eating contaminated pet food. Look it up. It was all over the news. The article was written using an FDA source – it is not misleading.

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  17. I don’t see a date at the top of the page as to when this was published..You start off by saying “Today……”.. When was “today” ? I just came here from a post in FB thinking it was recent. Any chance you can put dates at the top Mollie?
    You’re doing an awesome job… still <3

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    • All my posts are dated – they are at the bottom of every post. I believe the article was written on February 18, 2018. To move the dates to the top would mean changing the code of my theme.

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  18. I feed the Old Roy Kibble dog food to my dog’s is that contaminated as well I also feed Milk Bones to my dogs so if you could please tell me which ones are recalled that would be great to know thank you

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    • The article mentioned the canned Ol’ Roy dog food and it was found nearly a year ago.

      My advice?

      Choose another brand of dog food. Ol’ Roy is one of the lowest quality dog foods on the market. The lowest. If you care about your dog – which I’m sure you do, stop feeding it Ol’ Roy and Milk Bones. That food is just garbage. Check out http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com for reviews of dog food. I don’t do reviews. I will tell you which food I feed my cats though, and that is The Honest Kitchen. But it is very expensive.

      That the best I can do.

      Hope I was able to help.

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      • My dogs on raw food obtained from My butcher. Together with some fruit and veg. All rescued. Two Cavaliers now 13 years old and fit and healthy.

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        • Any supplements to make it a complete diet? I’m trying to cook for my dogs, but one has cancer and I’m trying to cut out the carbs. But keep it balanced if I can.

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          • I would feel more comfortable if you consult with a veterinary nutritionist. Alternatively, your vet might suggest BalanceIT. Or you could read Dr. Jean Hofve’s recommendations or read Dr. Lisa Pierson’s work.

            When my cats had cancer my holistic vet who worked in conjunction with BalanceIT to provide me an appropriate diet for my cats using bison meat. Additionally, there were other treatments that went beyond their diet.

            Therefore, I cannot say enough about getting a good holistic vet! They will have much better advice than me. I’m just a blogger with no professional training. But thanks for asking! :)

      • Have you ever tried giving ANSWERS raw pet food to your dogs? It is expensive, but in my opinion, the best. Snd my dogs love it!

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        • I was sent a sample of Answers, but I can’t buy it locally and shipping it is out of the question for financial reasons. While I hesitate to recommend a raw food I was particularly drawn to them because of their animal welfare standards. As a vegan, making these decisions is agonizing as my cats are obligate carnivores. So, I am always mindful of where and how those animals lived before they were killed.

          As a pet food safety expert, I understand the risks and benefits of feeding raw. It has to be personal decision one that I would never recommend unless someone completely understood the risks inherent in raw meat. Therefore I highly recommend consumers read my piece on raw pet food before making a decision:

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  19. why are they using euthanized animals in the dog food processes any way what i would like to know are they using animals from shelters or where they are getting them

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    • Because it’s cheap.

      The source of the material is likely from a renderer who accepts animals who may have been euthanized. Typically it is horses. One of the largest renderers on the East coast accepts horses that may have been euthanized.

      Currently, there is no method for tracking horses that have been euthanized.

      This is not the first time nor will it be the last time this happens. Put in my search box Evanger’s and Smucker’s – that should give you an idea of the scope of the problem.

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      • Usually euthanasia has to be done by a vet. The only ones that can be tracked are the registered and tattooed horses. They have to be reported as deceased to the registry. The renderer also accepts horses are cattle, etc., that are full of all kinds of other drugs too. I know because I work on a big racing farm. So another words, 99.99% of animals picked up by renderers are full of different kinds of drugs and going into pet food. All the pet food companies know this. They don’t care.

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        • Yes, good point! Thank you for reminding me. But all the other horses are not tracked. Many are picked up by dead animal haulers and taken to renderers. There is no quick and easy method for a dead animal hauler or a renderer to determine if the animal was euthanized with a drug. The FDA is currently working on a system to prevent this kind of thing from happening. But until such time, consumers should be concerned. All we can hope is that manufacturers are not buying product from renderers that take animals from dead animal haulers. And if they do, they should test their product before using it in a pet food.

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      • When I had no choice but to euthanize my horse the vet told me ahead of time he wouldn’t come until we had dug the grave. Which we did. The drug was called Succumb. He said it was very dangerous if any animals ingested it. This was in Central Ky.

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        • That’s great you had a good vet. Yes, it is extremely dangerous for scavengers to eat the carcasses. Most of the time it is preferable that they are buried, but dead animal haulers will come and remove dead horses. I know of one that picks them up from the University of Pennsylvania veterinary school and delivers them to Darling Industries. I have reported the matter to the authorities so hopefully, that practice will be discontinued.

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  20. I have a half of a case of the kibbles n bits that’s been recalled. My dogs already ate the other half. Who do I get in touch with?

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  21. I just lost my small Chihuahua I was feeding him some of the Ol Roy canned dog food mixed with Beneful could this possibly have been the cause of his death he started bleeding from the rectum and they could not save him

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    • Bad part is.. Legally they are only required to reimburse you for the cost of your dogs(you have to show a receipt), the cost of the food (must show receipt), & the cost of your vet bill (& you have to show a receipt for that). Oh & they can deduct for the age of the dog(s) if they are senior dogs. They don’t have to pay a damn thing that will even put a dent in their pocketbooks. I have looked this up because I had 6 cats & a dog die from tainted food.

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  22. i don’t think we should be feeding our pets their own brothers & sisters ( killed cats & dogs) anyway! that’s like saying all the homeless people be rendered into whatever you get my point! that maybe why peoples pets are sick all the time. not saying everyone should do it but i feed raw , there is a disease from eating people called prion or ( Kuru ) disease . maybe there is something similar for pets too! anyway i don’t feed the brains of any animal to my pets or me.

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  23. Pingback: Smucker's Withdraws More Pet Food Amid Deadly Drug Dog Food Scandal; Additional Skippy Lots and Ol' Roy Dog Treats Named | Poisoned Pets | Pet Food Safety News

  24. Not condoning in any way but offering insight into how some of these things can happen. Smucker’s may have a decent audit program. They may have pentobarbital specifically spelled out on the raw material specifications. The raw material providers may provide COAs that say the material is tested and met the specification. Or, at any time, any one of the links in the chain can become weak. Industry likes to constantly become more efficient in order to continue to offer product at low prices while still making a profit. This results in things like less training. The supplier auditing program may have inexperienced people performing the routine visits. Or maybe the visits aren’t so routine anymore, and are just desk audits in which the reviewer/approver is really at the mercy of what is being told to them by the documentation. Efficiency efforts can lead to skip lot testing (raw material provider OR the purchasing company may decide to skip lot test). They RM provider may still provide a COA stating that the material meets specification for pentobarbital, but with a caveat that it’s based on statistical analysis of some portion of testing over the previous X number of lots or years, etc. Plus, how far in the chain does the expectation for supplier controls reach? The manufacturer certainly is expected to audit the raw material suppliers. But the RM supplier, the renderer’s…are they expected to audit the shelters? Are there any controls on the renderer’s at all – do they have rules that they cannot use, for instance, road kill? My point is, the purchaser is not always privy to all of the efficiency short cuts that are being taken at the RM provider’s facility. Likewise, the manufacturer of the pet food may be taking efficiency shortcuts. The fact that this was identified 29 years ago and is still happening says that there is a lack of commitment, follow through, and monitoring. Further, lack of oversight by the FDA may be a very large contributing factor. Whether or not that is due to political reasons and lack of funding is a different conversation.

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  25. This is why we don’t feed commercial pet food anymore. I don’t trust the manufactures one iota. We were feeding a refrigerated high quality commercial food to our lab pups and after many months of feeding it, one began to throw up after each meal. It got to the point where he would even turn his nose away from his bowl and not eat. Who knows why one became sick and one didn’t. The smell of it had changed and it wasn’t appealing. And manufacturers can change the ingredients at any time without telling you. We now homemake the same food with quality human-grade ingredients and add the BalanceIT vitamins and minerals. The pups who are now almost two years old are thriving and are all solid muscle. Also, they are at a perfect weight. We also have our cats on BalanceIT. They no longer have health issues. They were allergic to many of the ingredients in commercial pet food. BalanceIT was designed by Board Certified Veterinarian nutritionists and you can get recipes on their website based on the weight of your pet(s). Cornell University said it’s the most hypoallergenic supplement on the market. And they’re right. With the cats, I was at my wits end. I could not find any canned commercial pet food that didn’t cause skin issues. Or, one that wouldn’t worsen my female’s asthma. Also, my female couldn’t handle a raw diet either. Nor human vitamins added to a home cooked diet. I tried everything. With trial and error and elimination diets, and patience like you wouldn’t believe, I know what works for them and what doesn’t. Thank God for BalanceIT —we will NEVER feed commercial food again. Also, we had extensive blood work done all the fur kids and their numbers came back with flying colors. No deficiencies whatsoever as some manufacturers would lead you to believe. “Oh don’t feed a homemade diet—it’s dangerous”. BLAH BLAH BLAH! Homemade diets work as long as they are done right. And after living with pets for almost 50 years, I can certainly see the difference it makes.

    And Mollie, thank God for you and all the hard work and sacrifice you do. And for exposing these manufacturers when they do wrong. It takes courage to do what you do. Please continue to be a voice for our beloved pets.

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    • I make all my Dogs and Cats food, I boil down a entire chicken, debone it, process it with unflavored gelatin. Then add canned Macarel fish, and barley. Some cooked veggies, some blueberries, or Apples. Both my 3 cats and my dogs eat this. They are extremely healthy. My diabetic cats blood sugar is way down. They no longer have bad breath. Or Shed so terrible.I cook the chicken till the bones are almost broken down.

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      • Good for you Dorothy!!! I would consider making sure your recipes are formulated to feed to cats and dogs. And don’t just get your recipes off some unreliable website. There is so much crap information out there. I recommend Dr. Lisa Pierson and Dr. Jean Hofve for the best information on home formulations. Just making sure! :)

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    • CrazyCatLady.. .
      What homemade ingredients do you use?
      We have home raised pork and beef, but even store bought chicken can be debatable on how it was fed and raised.
      Really would love a better option then trusting our pets food won’t have problems.
      Please share details on your homemade recipe or site link that gives that info. Thanks!

      Reply

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