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Ol’ Roy Dog Food Withdrawn For Deadly Drug Contamination; Pentobarbital Found In Canned Dog Food

UPDATE (June 21, 2019) : Because of the tremendous amount of traffic this post has recieved and the overwhelming number of panicked replies and emails – I need to emphasize that this article was written on February 15, 2018. While the problem with Ol’ Roy Dog Food may be dated, the problem of pentobarbital surfacing in pet food continues today.

Today, we learn of yet another national brand of dog food was found to contain the lethal euthanizing drug sodium pentobarbital: Walmart’s brand Ol’ Roy canned dog food. Walmart, the nation’s largest retailer, is now in the process of quietly removing it from all 4,700 stores across America.

At this point, we do not know which Ol’ Roy formulas are affected. There is no information on Walmart’s recall page about the Ol’ Roy pet food withdrawal, nor has Walmart made a public announcement.

This latest discovery was made during an investigation by ABC7 News into pentobarbital-laced pet food following the Evanger’s debacle. This news follows days after the revelation that several other Big Heart Brand dog foods also tested positive for the drug. After ABC7 releasing the results of lab tests that identified the drug, the FDA launched an investigation.

FOUR BRANDS + MULTIPLE VARIETIES NAMED

Yesterday, we learned that in addition to today’s news about Walmart’s Ol’ Roy canned dog food, that Big Heart Pet Brand’s Kibbles n’ Bits, Gravy Train and Skippy brand canned dog foods also tested positive for the deadly drug – a drug commonly used to euthanize pets. The news prompted a notice for a nationwide withdrawal of the tainted pet food in which retailers were instructed to pull the tainted dog food from their stores and destroy the product.

The number of brands of dogs found to contain the deadly drug, since the investigation began, has risen steadily to include today’s count of nine varieties of Gravy Train canned dog foods, seven varieties of Kibbles n’ Bits canned dog foods, and one variety of Skippy canned dog food.

GRAVY TRAIN’S DENIAL OF RESPONSIBILITY

On Gravy Train’s website, there is a notice in regards to the discovery of pentobarbital laced dog food, which they refer to as a “claim.” They claim that the products only contain what they describe as “extremely low levels of pentobarbital” and therefore “do not pose a threat to pet safety” admitting only that they are “disappointed that pentobarbital was introduced to our supply chain.”

Instead of taking responsibility for their failure to follow strict auditing practices, they point the blame on a “single supplier.” Curiously, they also claim that none of their foods contain “euthanized animals or pets” in their pet food, nor do their foods contain “3D or 4D meat such as dead, dying, disabled, or diseased animals.”

BIG HEART BRAND’S EMPIRE OF NATIONAL BRANDS

Big Heart Brands manufacturers an enormous amount of branded – and private label – dry and wet pet food, and pet snacks under the Meow Mix, Milk-Bone, Kibbles ‘n Bits, 9Lives, Natural Balance, Pup-Peroni, Gravy Train, Nature’s Recipe, Canine Carry Outs, Milo’s Kitchen, Reward, Pounce, Cycle, Morris, Jerky Treats, Amore, Meaty Bone, Alley Cat, Snausages, Tartar Check, Flavor Snacks, GravyBones, Super Supper, Ham & Cheesers, Steak & Cheesers, Surf n’ Turf, Farm Stand Selects, Growing Years, Snaw Somes!, Marosnacks, Wholesome Goodness, Plus Care, Bold Meaty Satisfaction!, Acatemy, Combo Bites, Let’s Play, Carribean Catch, Chew-lotta, Pawfections, Kitten Lil’ Nibbles, in addition to many, many other brand names.

Unfortunately, as Big Heart Pet Brands also produces and distributes a number of private label pet products, we cannot know which private label brands may also be contaminated with pentobarbital.

GRAVY TRAIN CONTAMINATED PRODUCT

Item Name UPC Item Code(s)
Gravy Train 13.2 oz. with T-Bone Flavor Chunks 7910052541
Gravy Train 13.2 oz. with Beef Strips 7910052542
Gravy Train 13.2 oz. with Lamb and Rice Chunks 7910052543
Gravy Train 22 oz. with Chicken Chunks 7910051645
Gravy Train 22 oz. with Beef Chunks 7910051647
Gravy Train 13.2 oz. with Beef Chunks 7910034417
Gravy Train 13.2 oz. with Chicken Chunks 7910034418
Gravy Train 13.2 oz. Chunks in Gravy Stew 7910051933
Gravy Train 13.2 oz. Chicken, Beef & Liver Medley 7910051934
Gravy Train 13.2 oz. Chunks in Gravy with Beef Chunks 7910034417

KIBBLES ‘N BITS CONTAMINATED PRODUCT

Item Name UPC Item Code(s)
Kibbles ‘N Bits 13.2 oz. Burger Bacon Cheese and Turkey Bacon Vegetable Variety 12-Pack 79100103777910010378
Kibbles ‘N Bits 13.2 oz. Beef, Chicken, Vegetable, Meatball Pasta and Turkey Bacon Vegetable Var. Pack 79100103827910048367
7910010378
Kibbles ‘N Bits 13.2 oz. Beef, Chicken, Vegetable, Burger Bacon Cheese and Beef Vegetable Variety Pack 79100103807910010377
7910010375
Kibbles ‘N Bits 13.2 oz. Wet Variety Pack 79100103757910048367
Kibbles ‘N Bits 13.2 oz. Chef’s Choice Bistro Tender Cuts with Real Beef & Vegetable in Gravy 79100103757910048367
Kibbles ‘N Bits Chef’s Choice Homestyle Tender Slices with Real Beef, Chicken & Vegetables in Gravy 7910010380
Kibbles ‘N Bits Chef’s Choice Bistro Tender Cuts with Real Turkey, Bacon & Vegetable in Gravy 7910010378

THE COMPLETE LIST OF AFFECTED PET FOODS

Pulled-Dog-Foods

WHICH BRANDS ARE NEXT?

As more Big Heart Brands pet foods are discovered to contain the deadly drug, it is possible – and based on emerging information and the lack of quality control – that other Big Heart brands may also contain material from the same supplier that supplied them with the pentobarbital-laced meat. Therefore, it would wise to avoid feeding your pet any Big Heart pet food brands until an investigation into the matter is complete.

UTTER + MISERABLE FAILURE

What consumers want to know is why did Smucker’s fail to have adequate safeguards in place to prevent this tragedy from occurring? How did one of the nations largest maker of pet food fail so utterly and miserably at auditing their suppliers and testing their ingredients that allowed a deadly drug (which can only come from euthanized animals) to slip into their pet foods?

WHO TO CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

For more information about all the affected pet foods, contact Big Heart Brand’s corporate website.

For additional information about the Kibbles ‘n Bits affected product go here. If you have questions, please call them at 800-828-9980 or email them here.

For more information, contact Gravy Train at 800-828-9980 or via email here.

To find out how to report a problem with a pet food contact the FDA.

RELATED NEWS ON POISONED PETS

Deadly Drug Found in Dog Food; Smucker’s Gravy Train Contaminated with Pentobarbital, February 9, 2018

Lawsuit Filed Against Maker of Deadly Drug-Laced Dog Food; Big Heart Brand Gravy Train Dog Food Named in Suit, February 13, 2018

Big Heart Brands Recalls Multiple Brands of Dog Food For Pentobarbital; Gravy Train, Kibbles n’ Bits, and Skippy Dog Food Withdrawn, February 18, 2018

 

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Mollie Morrissette

Mollie Morrissette, author of Poisoned Pets, is an animal food safety expert and advisor to AAFCO. Help support her work by making a donation today.

Comments (259) Write a comment

  1. We recently (June 2019) purchased a large bag of dry old roy dog food from Wal-Mart. Both our dogs became sick and stop eating. We gave them something different but one dog is really sick and will go to vet Monday. Is something wrong with the dry old roy food recently?

    Reply

    • As far as I am aware the problem has been corrected, however, the Ol’ Roy dog food is one of the worst on the market in terms of quality. If you value your dogs, which I’m sure you do, you will stop feeding it that food asap.

      I highly recommend feeding them instead with a human edible dog food made in a human food facility with organic ingredients. Be sure the pet food is made in a human food facility – this is an important distinction.

      Reply

  2. How does a euthanizing drug end up in dog food? Unless some companies that collect dead animals from vets have a side business in the meat industry…

    Reply

    • I’ll tell you why – the company was unaware the feed contained sodium pentobarbital. However, it is the companies responsibility to test all incoming ingredients for safety but they didn’t. So that’s how it happened.

      Reply

    • What purpose? Because they put profits ahead of health! They must be buying dead carcasses from Vets Offices to grind up and put protein in their extruded food.

      Reply

      • The reports I have gotten from dead animal haulers is that they pick up dead horses from veterinary schools/universities and take them to renderers. The resulting product – animal meal and animal fat – is sometimes used in the manufacture of animal feed. But no one is making money off of buying dead horses, the renderers are doing it as a service, because in many counties disposing of them, such as burying them, is highly restricted. And incinerating an animal of that size is not practical because of their size. Many states do not even have an incinerator, because of air quality regulations, and because of the cost of building them.

        But because of these events where pentobarbital is being found in pet food – many renderers are refusing to take horses. The FDA has also recently developed a validated test to moniter for the presence of the drug.

        Reply

  3. Can you please tell me who makes the Aldi store brand dry dog food? I feed my 2 dogs this brand and their not sick, but now I’m concerned. Thank You in advance

    Reply

    • Hi Jan, you’d have to ask Aldi. It is a private label Aldi brand made by a third party contractor. Personally, I do not buy chain store brands. I prefer to buy human edible pet food made in a human food processing plant to human food standards by a company I know and trust.

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      • Hello, Mollie.
        My name is, Lisa Coyle-Prichard.

        I am shocked from learning this! I have been questioning any and all dog foods, lately. The number of pets, dogs and cats specifically, that have been dying of cancer lately has me alarmed.
        I have been feeding my two toy poodles ‘Taste of The Wild’ dry food and ‘Purina Beneful Incredibites’ for a number of years. They are eight-year-old brothers. So far, neither of them have had any food related issues, that I know of. Also, I have been giving them Nudges Jerky Treats occasionally. Do you know if these treats are detrimental to dogs’ health?
        Thank you very much for your knowledge and wisdom in this article.

        Sincerely,
        Lisa Coyle-Prichard

        P.S. I have been wondering about ‘Fresh Pet’. I hope I’m thinking of the correct name. It’s the one that is in its own little refrigerated stand in the grocery stores. It looks like processed meat with vegetables in it. I think I remember seeing peas and carrot bits in it. Do you know anything about this food as to whether or not it is good or lethal?

        Thank you! 🙂

        Reply

      • A whole better idea there or just could make homemade pet food of ones choice.

        Reply

        • I feed them a dehydrated human edible cat food made in a human food processing facility. I guess you could say it’s expensive, but in comparison to many “premium” pet foods – it’s not. And I also have the comfort of knowing it’s good enough for humans to eat.

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  4. I do think it’s so sad that people share “Old News” but in another way, stop and look at the blessing. I learned SO MUCH from reading the article and then even into the comments. Mollie, I went to the websites that you posted to the lady that posted her recipe for the homemade dog food using the chicken , pure’d peas and yams etc and you had mentioned not to forget the most important thing… their supplements and nutrients, etc. My nerves are pretty racked after the day I have had.. Could you please help me find whatever is good for my elderly chihuahua in supplements to add to her food without getting confused with the entire page for cats and dogs lol. Thanks so much…. Have a Blessed Week.

    Reply

    • I wholeheartedly agree! Victor is GREAT for my dogs! We also add some raw as well. I am concerned that this sight asks for donations and I see nowhere that it’s a non-profit?? I do not give to organizations that are not a registered 501(C)3 non-profit entity.

      Reply

      • I have chosen not to file as a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization governed by Section 501(c)(3) of the IRS Code, because it would prohibit me from engaging in political activity, including lobbying to US government.

        In case you’re wondering whether I am swimming in funding – I am not. Currently, I do not receive enough donations to pay for hosting this website let alone any other expense like paying for attending the twice-yearly AAFCO conferences.

        And even though the pet food industry is a $9 billion dollar enterprise, I receive less than $1,200-$2000 per year in donations from readers like you. If everyone who visited Poisoned Pets donated just one dollar I could stop asking for donations in one day. But they don’t so I still have to keep asking for them.

        Reply

  5. Interested to know if youve done any coverage of the growing evidence of the link between grain free boutique foods and the deadly heart issue DCM?

    Reply

    • Shana, The issue with grain free food is the lack of Taurine. supplementing with low sodium water packed sardines twice a week is the solution. No need to shame Boutique pet food suppliers. They are not like designer jeans, they are there because they refuse to sell their souls to corporate scum like Mars, Ol Roy and Nestle. Be grateful for the boutique pet suppliers!

      Reply

      • Curious why you include Mars under your corporate scum umbrella? Mars is the only company to have NEVER had an issue with the pet food that it produces.

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  6. Jennifer Thorn.

    Seriously people I know it saves money and sometimes all you can afford but you’re killing your dogs 😭 why it’s even necessary to put this is this food makes no sense.

    It’s cheaper to make your dogs food and healthier by boiling a whole chicken in a stock pot until the meat falls off the bone. Pull all the meat off of the chicken shred it. Boil 4 cups white rice, pure, frozen or can peas carrots & yams in a blender. Stir everything together add chicken stock from the boiled chick to the mixture until real moist and sticky. Add any additional supplements or vitamins you feel your dog needs to the mixture. Fish oil is really good. They love it and is gentle on your pocket book. Keep in mind if depending on the # of dogs you have because of the chicken you it turns bad after 4 days if refrigerated and they can get sick. Freeze what you think won’t be used and pull out to thaw as needed! I did this for years with my dogs. They loved it and made their coats great! My busy schedule I would let the chicken cook in the crock pot all day while I was at work it fell right off the bones by the time I got home and the broth was much more rich in flavor. I made the mixture when I got home. Huge time saver!

    Reply

    • That’s great! I commend you for taking the time to do it. As you say it’s not that hard and it is often much less costly than some commercial brands of pet food. However, you must pay particular attention to supplementation. As it is their only source of food you have to make certain it is complete and balanced. Here are some great sources of information regarding feeding your pets a homemade diet that I highly recommend: https://catinfo.org/making-cat-food/#Dog and https://littlebigcat.com/nutrition/easy-homemade-diets-for-cats-and-dogs/.

      Reply

      • I add TrueDog, for supplement. Only meat, blood, bones, and organs that are freeze dried. This is what they would have in the wild. My Chihuahua gets 1T per 1/2 cup of food. I use Utra dog food, no grains, gmo, fillers, or color added. I don’t use chicken anymore, this may be what caused allergies, too. He is doing much better and even plays more, he is 9 years old..
        I watch a 117 lb Lab and 25 lb Jack Russell, they both want to eat my dogs food.
        Truedog, I buy on Internet.

        Even if you make ur own food, u can’t just give supplements, talk to ur vet or someone that knows nutritions, just to be sure they are getting what they need

        Reply

        • Even if you make human food for your cherished babies, our food is contaminated as well. I cook food for my babies and give them store bought dog food as a supplement. I have found the meat (chicken and turkey )has been spoiled or recalled, veggies frequently are from areas of the world that do not have our standards (or standards we used to have). I thought I was doing well for my babies feeding them organic foul and then found out they preserve with rosemary. While rosemary is not harmful in this venue I was shocked that it was there and the young man in the store said I needed to read the ingredients. What packaged turkey? Ingredient list? I recently read that kale is filled with pesticides here in the states (my vet recommended recipe calls for a bit of kale).

          It too is a struggle when you cook homemade to have the right supplements and make sure they too are not contaminated. I ended up for calcium supplement grinding my own egg shells into a powder. But then what about the eggs and the shells are they too contaminated?
          Anyway it is struggle to keep us all away from contaminated food. I suspect folks reading my post will think I have gone overboard but I began really seeing this stuff as started making food for my sweet kids.

          Reply

    • I do this as well, but mix it in with their kibble. I make it with whole chicken and also with chicken livers. I have several dogs. But with all this horrible news, I may need to start doing this with no kibble.

      Reply

    • THEY don’t put it in with intent. Its in the euthanasia cocktail to kill pets/animals, etc. Its the cheap ass shit animal carcasses that are ground into the dog FOOD….even horses and dead dogs etc. that have been euthanized. You get what you pay for. Although this also happened with a high end food a couple years back, EVANGERS, which I was using at the time.

      Reply

      • Pet food manufacturers are responsible for evaluating the quality of the ingredients. They should test and hold all incoming ingredients, but many don’t. When these things happen the fault lies with the manufacturer, not the ingredient supplier.

        Reply

    • Thank You for this… I just changed my elderly Chihuahua that we adopted a little over 7 years ago from dry kibble that she hated, to soft food. Most recalls though are soft food but after reading all of this, I now want to make my own food and will use your guide and also get more input from Mollie about the supplements and such as I did not quite understand what my Angel needs. Thank You for taking that time to post a recipe. Have a Blessed week ahead…… Christy & Angel.

      Reply

    • WOW! I just saw this post for dog food – can I add that I do this for CATS ? I take a whole chicken, or better yet, you can find “bags of chicken” at most gro. stores . I like the Thighs best. If a whole chicken, I cook in crock pot ALL DAY AND OVER NIGHT . I do add about a tea. of salt ( LOW. cook by night time ) drain chicken- save ALL broth. I hand pick it, and when it comes to the bones ( calcium !! ) I hand “roll “them and all but the small part in the middle will smash apart- throw out the center, or hard part of each bone. Smash rib bones too. After all that time in crock pot THEY WILL SMASH SO EASY !—CALCIUM-CALCIUM !!! Divide pieces of chicken with broth and freeze in about 1 pint containers-I get about 4-5 pints. OR I put sm. amounts in blender at a time, then mix ALL together and divide into freezer containers. Sounds like a lot of work- but not bad when you end up with 4-5 very health broth, and chicken. FOR DOGS OR CATS !! Have had as many as 27 cats , dumped on me by a sorry ” shelter” 18 yrs ago- down to 9 cats now !! That broth helped feed a lot of kittens and kept them healthy !!

      Reply

  7. We gave our Maggie the ol roy and we couldnt afford to give her people food every meal. We hated to give her dog food eventually we were able to give her more people food and she would eat less of the dog food. We had to put her to sleep because she was diagnosed with stomach, oral and brain cancer do to the Ol Roy thankfully we switch her to a diffrent type and feed her mainly people but only gave her the dog food when needed

    Reply

    • I am so sorry to hear this Melinda. It’s true, pet food can be expensive, but vet bills are more expensive and heartbreaking. If you can buy the best you can afford and try to make sure it is a “human grade” pet food. It’s so worth it.

      Reply

  8. From your comments you are not a fan of any commercial dog food. I will bite though and ask. Thoughts on Canidae Salmon & Sweet Potato?

    Reply

    • The only reason I worry about pet food versus human grade or human edible pet food is that the laws governing pet food are not adequate enough for me to recommend it. There is a vast difference, in every respect, between pet food made under human food laws than pet food made under animal feed laws. That is the criteria I use to judge a pet food. That said, manufacturers such as Canidae could be fine, but we just don’t know. There is no assurance it is equal to human food. And chances are it is not. That is a risk I am not willing to take. Therefore I hesitate in telling you I think it OK. My advice is to buy human edible pet food.

      Reply

    • High ED ! I just posted one above. I have raised dogs and cats, in the past-puppies in the HOUSE ( Shih-Tzu,but stopped when I came back to Texas and saw all the killing of dogs ! I have tried all kinds of food and ” mixtures ” on my pets food- and had some of the healthiest pups ever ! But back then, I worked Labor/ Delivery at Baylor Hospital, and had the Nursery save me ALL left over baby bottles !! Mixed all with baby rice cereal. for pups and kittens !! When older they got the “chicken” ! also use “DocRoys” Potassium citrate,cranbery powder DON’T CONFUSE WITH -OLD ROY !-and their Daily Care Feline vit. for cats. along with –American Journey wild Alaskan salmon oil. ( small amt ) get it on “Amazon) Have 2 cats that are 18, and 2 that are 19 yrs old !! Good luck !

      Reply

  9. So Wat if it’s dated, if a person had a dog and it died couldn’t know the cost of a autopsy now they know why maybe the dog died if it was healthy but they were fed it that kind of dog food. Or I want to be a new dog owner so I’m doing some research and I come across this site and I read up on it then I’m informed.. I once saw a video and a Christian channel of some people who went Undercover into a dog food factory and they saw dead dogs and cats with their collars on and tags .food that they got from grocery stores Meat and Fish so the packaging is styrofoam, plastic wrap that zorbing s*** that they put on the bottom of the meat underneath the meat fish .fish bones all being processed into dog food and I believe there was some freaking Roadkill I wish I can find that video. .. so yeah between dogs being killed and getting cancer and stuff… don’t you ever wonder… stop complaining ,be informed , share the info. your testimonies. save a life

    Reply

    • I watched a video! They do use euthanized animals for dog food! They use the same laws that are used for cattle and horses! There is no one looking over their shoulders to make sure they do the right thing! Be very careful with your furbabies, these people don’t care about anything but profits!

      Reply

      • Those videos show pets being rendered not turned into dog food. You have to be careful about how videos are spun on YouTube because anyone with an agenda can tell you they are turning it into dog food but they are really being dumped collars, plastic bags and all into a blender.

        No one – I mean no one – has been able to find canine or feline DNA in pet food or animal feed. Ever.

        That’s not to say it hasn’t happened, but any reputable manufacturer would be taking an enormous risk in buying an animal meal or animal fat from a renderer that renders pets. Because if they were caught their business would be finished.

        Reply

        • You are 100% incorrect. I have been studying this topic full time for the past two years and they have cases of legal court documents proving that they use rendered euthanized animals! Not only do they have the court documents and testimonials from the manufactures, they have tested the food and found huge amounts of DNA.

          “Because if they were caught their business would be finished”. Really? This is what you believe? Wow. Please, for the sake of your pets, do some real research and save yourself the heartache.

          Reply

          • What I meant is if a pet food company is caught their business would suffer greatly. Take the Gravy Train debacle, for example, Nestle closed down the entire line. The Gravy Train brand is dead. That’s what happens when a company is caught. Not to mention the 27+ lawsuits Nestle is facing right now.

  10. Why is the world would these drugs get in the hands of these pet food manufacturers in the first place. It’s almost like they want to cut the pet population then report the recall. They need to shut down these companies for having these drugs in the first place!

    Reply

    • The drugs are from animals that have been euthanized and those animals find their way into the animal food stream. Currently, there is no method for renderers to determine the cause of death and the FDA has no means of tracking animals that have been euthanized. And pet food companies do not test their incoming ingredients for the drug. But hopefully, with scandals like this, pet food companies will now make the effort or face ruin.

      Reply

    • because these companies use 3-D And 4-D meats to make the dog food and that could explain why the drug is in the food but i haven’t used commercial dog food in almost a year, i fix my dogs food at home on the stove every week, beef , chicken, turkey, fish, veggies, fruits and oats. here is the definition of 3-d and 4-d meat.
      3D and 4D Defined. The term comes from the first letter of the description of meat from animals which are dead, diseased, dying (or downed)—that’s 3D—but the animals are still alive. The 4th “D” is destroyed (all 4 or 4D), which means that the animal is dead

      Reply

    • Well, I read an article a while back that claimed certain companies who pick up the euthanized animals actually sell their bodies to companies who make the cat food. That’s what the “Meat by Products are, which are listed on the can. :(

      Reply

  11. Once again another post about dog food killing are pets.This post shows it was 2/18. We the owners need to do more to prevent this from ever happening again.This is so wrong is so many ways.

    Reply

  12. WHY IS THERE NO DATE ON THIS POST??? I see recent comments but I also see “FEBRUARY 15, 2018 COMMENTS 161
    Filed under: Dog Food”
    So is this current or not?

    Reply

  13. Would the ol Roy mini treats be okay to use? They are the version of mini Milk bones brand.

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  14. Can you please tell me how old this article is? I shared it on FB and am now being bashed because they think I am crying wolf. Cant believe some people.

    Reply

      • If it was written a year ago, it is not still relevant at all and it is deceptive to say that it is. A lot can happen in a year. This makes it seem like it is happening right now.

        Reply

        • Yes, you are correct, this subject with regards to Ol’ Roy has, we hope, been resolved as the product was removed from the market. However, what I meant to say (and I should have made this clear), is that the topic of pentobarbital contamination in pet food (with the exclusion of Ol’ Roy) is still a problem that haunts the pet food industry today. I can cite several examples of recent findings if you like. But you can Google it or look on my website for more information.

          Reply

  15. I have been cautioning anybody with a dog not to use Ol Roy after my dog went into convulsions after I fed him only a small amount.He survived luckly but is wary of any canned food now.

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  16. Can you explain how a high school diploma and 36 years of experience as an art director, graphics designer, commercial illustrator and ad exec qualifies you to be an animal food safety expert?

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    • Well, Joe, I’m glad you asked. I consider myself an expert after spending 10 years doing intensive research and study in the field of pet food safety.

      And because of my natural charm and intelligence, I am now the only consumer advisor with no affiliation to the pet food industry in the United States at AAFCO.

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      • Sorry, but that no where even close to qualifies you to post this. I would say your arrogance has overshadowed anything good you might be attempting to do. Seems as tho you should stop thinking so highly of yourself.

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        • I was being sarcastic. You do have a sense of humor, don’t you?

          Lindlell, who, in your opinion, does qualify to be a pet food safety expert (that is not affiliated with the pet food industry)? I’d really like to know. And what are their experience and education? And are they an AAFCO consumer advisor?

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      • Good for you Mollie…these people are absurd questioning your qualifications to provide them with FREE pet advice/ information. How lazy can you be to criticize an article because the date is not at the top, and easily accesible enough for you to not have to SCROLL DOWN. C’mon people, take the information, which STILL applies today, and do what you feel is best for your pets. Do NOT try to tear down the source because you are too cheap to supply your animals with the most healthy option, which would be exactly what she recommends…human grade food. It is not cheap, but the peace of mind is priceless. Don’t be stingy, and then want to shoot the messenger of info you do not want to hear, because cutting out that daily latte is too large of an adjustment for you. She can only give her recommendations. She will not, and should not, defend brands that are not healthy in her oponion, just because they are more convenient and ultimately cheaper for YOU. Take your FREE info, and make a decision you can sleep with at night. I thank you, Mollie, for using your own resources to provide us information you have investigated in your own time.

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        • Thanks for the support, Desiree. In case people are still wondering, the default location for author metadata in WordPress is at the bottom of posts. What I find frustrating is that people are missing the bigger picture – the problem still exists in pet food today.

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  17. Unbeliviable :( How it is possible at US? Use hermospet.com it is more healthier because it is simple and GMO free…

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  18. I use a prescription by my vet. It is science diet but for digestive system and can only get this one from the vet’s office. Is science diet though .would this one be ok

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  19. DATE YOUR ARTICLES. Judging by the dates of the comments this story is over a year old, but readers have no way of knowing because you have failed to provide the minimum information needed.

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  20. this news is saddening and sickeningly vile! absolutely imperative to those pet owners to know these criminals are using corpses filled with euthanasia chemicals!!!

    This warning effects so many fur babies. so many low income pet-owners are out there who have no choice to buy the cheapest feed because they barely have for themselves. some people buy it to use, like community pet feeders on a budget or low income.
    Sounds like the meat in this cheap dog food come from the dead corpses of recently euthanized dogs and cats from county shelters and vets. refridgerated, collected and sold in bulk.. they pay them to cremate but look what happens!!! SHAME!

    disgusting! they dont care about DOGS OR LIFE! you cant when youre feeding them death!! fouler than involuntary canibalism. glad i dont use this but i have occassionally used them! never again!

    Reply

    • Yes, it is very sad. While no one can say for certain that the source of the pentobarbital was from euthanized dogs and cats, it is my suspicion that it was probably from euthanized horses. Unless species analysis is conducted we can never be sure. It would be in the companies best interest to do so to allay the fear that consumers have that their pet’s food could contain the rendered remains of dogs and cats. Or indeed of horses.

      Reply

      • Animal digest can contain any animal including roadkill. Most are probably livestock but they also render in pets from shelters, labs, etc. and possibly from vets. It depends on how the vet disposes of carcasses.

        Reply

      • How are horses entering the pet food supply chain? Horse slaughter is still illegal in the U.S. Is there a black market that sells euthanized horses to rendering plants?

        Reply

        • I can’t say for certain, but I believe it was from euthanized horses. Horse slaughter is illegal but putting your horse down is not. It’s not a black market, they are accepted by renderers – in fact, all animals are accepted. How they died is irrelevant. But the main point we need to remember is that rendered ingredients are a high-risk product, one that I, personally, would avoid.

          Reply

        • law signed in, I believe, 2009 allows horses to be shipped to Mexico and Canada for slaughter, then back to the US for processing/packing/consumption- this of course bypasses the law that banned horses from being killed in US slaughter houses.

          Reply

          • The term “slaughter” refers to live horses. Horses that die of natural causes in the US are allowed to be rendered. Horses that have been euthanized are not allowed in animal feed, however, renderers cannot determine how a horse died when they are presented to them. That’s how pentobarbital ends up in rendered material such as meat and bone meal, etc.

  21. Really wish this article was DATED, so we know if it’s a recent event or one from a year ago.

    Reply

  22. I’m worried now, I have 3 english bullies and feed them blue buffalo, is it ok to feed??

    Reply

  23. I have a 12 year old whippet who is a picky eater (all five of the whippets I’ve had have been picky eaters, some more than others). I was feeding him the Kirkland (Costco) brand Chicken and Rice dog food but on a Whippet Facebook group discussing feeding raw vs grain free vs home cooked vs commercial kibble, the advice I got was to feed ProPlan 30/20. What do you think of the Purina brand dog foods?

    Reply

    • I’m not a fan of ProPlan. I would rather see you feed your babies a human-edible pet food make with whole foods. Try to stay away from kibble type dog foods. They are too highly processed in my opinion. I hope that helps!

      Reply

    • Purina is garbage too
      Get a good brand food from the dog food or pet store
      It’s so worth it
      The other garbage causes way too many health problems 😢

      Reply

    • I have been feeding my Whippets the Proplan Focus Lamb and rice small bites for 4 years now. The dogs have been doing fabulous on it. And no recalls.

      Reply

    • I have been a Purina fan for over 50 years, never a problem with it, check for recalls and you will find you may not find any. I adopt senior and hospice dogs and they do very good with Purina one smart blend.

      Reply

      • I use Purina Beyond, salmon plus. My dogs are doing fine that I know of.
        My question is what is wrong with Milk Bone treats?

        Reply

        • Read the ingredient list: Wheat Flour, Wheat Bran, Meat and Bone Meal, Milk, Wheat Germ, Beef Fat (Preserved with BHA), Salt, Natural Flavor, etc., etc.

          Milk Bones are the nutritional equivalent of Cheerios. But worse, because the ingredients are not fit for human consumption and are animal feed grade ingredients that can mean the ingredients are of poor quality.

          It’s not a product I would ever feed to a dog.

          Reply

          • Try mini carrots, mini rice cakes, or just got to the health food store and look around for some mini-sized whole grain crackers. Or you can make your own doggie biscuits using whole grains, bran, nut flours, sesame seeds – for example. It’s super easy! And fun!

  24. When did you originally write this? Putting a date on it is important for all . Thank you

    Reply

      • It would help if you dated them at the top. I have relatives who bever read all the way to the end and who are posting this like it’s happening right now! How do new readers know your writing style of posting at the bottom?

        Reply

          • Because that’s human nature! People will repost without having ever read the original source article. I can’t tell you how many times I have read an article before reposting only to find that it’s outdated. Yes, it’s irresponsible, but the majority of people out there can’t be bothered to fact check before hitting ‘share’.

      • Thank you for your intelligent comments here in this thread. I feed my rescue dogs air dried beef from ziwi peaks it’s expensive but they love it. I also mix in real veggies from the crisper and they eat carrots kale and other geeens.

        Reply

  25. Im so glad that my buddies are on a complete raw diet. Agrree that even raw diet is not that healthy. But atkeast they are way much better from this processed foodmcans which contains all sorta chemicals and preservatives. Best is to make home made food for the lil buddies. There safety is our no 1 priority.

    Reply

  26. From what I read milk-bone is ok. I hope no pet dies from this. I have recently lost a loved 14 year old pet and would have went crazy if it was because of drugged pet food. I now have a new puppy that i treat like a queen. She loves milk bone treats but will have nothing to do with ol Roy. Maybe she is smarter than we are?

    Reply

    • Look at the ingredients of Milk Bone. It’s garbage. It’s the nutritional equivelant of Cheerios for dogs, but worse because it is a pet treat made to pet food ingredients made to pet food manufacturing standards – not human edible standards. Try a healthy – human edible snack – vegetables, fruit, a little peanut butter on a human edible low-sodium cracker. Or better yet, make your own treats.

      Reply

  27. Here’s the issue. When money was not an issue, my four large dogs all got either home made food or the best of the raw diet foods. But as a retired person where money is an issue, I have to use the best possible food that I can afford. I subscribed to all the helpful newsletters and made a choice. I still have four large dogs. If someone can provide information on how to economically make my own dog food I would appreciate it. I live in a rural area with no butcher shops.

    Reply

    • Hi Sharon, I recommend Dr. Lisa Pierson (https://catinfo.org/making-cat-food/#Dogs) and Dr. Jean Hofve (https://littlebigcat.com/nutrition/easy-homemade-diets-for-cats-and-dogs/) for fabulous advice on how to make homemade pet food. It can be done economically!

      I also live in a rural area and I can usually afford to buy farm fresh free range organic eggs from a local farmer.

      Butchers, sadly, are a thing of the past and even the local livestock farmers here do not slaughter and dress their own animals – they are sent to a separate facility for hours away to do that – so no offal for cats or dogs I’m afraid. What I do buy is their human-edible liver and hearts from these local farmers. They are typically sold at the health food store and the farmer’s market. You could look into that.

      Reply

  28. A Look Inside a Rendering Plant
    1996;

    Rendering has been called “the silent industry.” Each year in the US, 286 rendering plants quietly dispose of more than 12.5 million tons of dead animals, fat and meat wastes. As the public relations watchdog newsletter PR Watch observes, renderers “are thankful that most people remain blissfully unaware of their existence.”

    When City Paper reporter Van Smith visited Baltimore’s Valley Proteins rendering plant last summer, he found that the “hoggers” (the large vats used to grind and filter animal tissues prior to deep-fat frying) held an eclectic mix of body parts ranging from “dead dogs, cats, raccoons, possums, deer, foxes [and] snakes” to a “baby circus elephant” and the remains of Bozeman, a Police Department quarterhorse that “died in the line of duty.”

    In an average month, Baltimore’s pound hands over 1,824 dead animals to Valley Proteins. Last year, the plant transformed 150 millions pounds of decaying flesh and kitchen grease into 80 million pounds of commercial meat and bone meal, tallow and yellow grease. Thirty years ago, most of the renderer’s wastes came from small markets and slaughterhouses. Today, thanks to the proliferation of fast-food restaurants, nearly half the “raw material” is kitchen grease and frying oil.

    Recycling dead pets and wildlife into animal food is “a very small part of the business that we don’t like to advertise,” Valley Proteins’ president J. J. Smith told City Paper. The plant processes these animals as a “public service, not for profit,” Smith said, since ”there is not a lot of protein and fat [on pets]…, just a lot of hair you have to deal with somehow.”

    According to the City Paper, Valley Proteins “sells inedible animal parts and rendered material to Alpo, Heinz and Ralston-Purina.” Valley Proteins insists that it does not sell “dead-pet byproducts” to pet food firms since “they are all very sensitive to the recycled pet potential.” Valley Proteins maintains two production lines — one for clean meat and bones and a second line for dead pets and wildlife. However, Smith reported, “the protein material is a mix from both production lines. Thus the meat and bone meal made at the plant includes materials from pets and wildlife, and about five percent of that product goes to dry-pet-food manufacturers….”

    A 1991 USDA report states that, “approximately 7.9 billion pounds of meat and bone meal, blood meal and feather meal [were] produced in 1983.” Of that amount, 34 percent was used in pet food, 34 percent in poultry feed, 20 percent in pig food and ten percent in beef and dairy cattle feed.

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) carried in pig and chicken-laden foods eventually may eclipse the threat of “Mad Cow Disease.” The risk of household pet-exposure to TSE from contaminated pet food is more than three times greater than the risk for hamburger-eating humans.

    Reply

    • I am very familiar with Van Smith’s article. Even though it is dated, it is still mostly true today. Rendering is a necessary evil and a by-product of our meat consuming society. Most cities do not have crematoriums. To my knowledge, cats and dogs are rendered only at independent renderers which do not typically sell their product to any reputable pet food manufacturer. There is too much risk involved for the pet food manufacturer. Anyone can test their product for traces of pentobarbital and if it comes back positive the company is finished. The independent renderers I spoke to told me that they sell their product to the companies that make fertilizer or fish feed that is used in Asia to feed fish raised on fish farms. Think about that the next time you eat fish.

      Reply

      • “To my knowledge, cats and dogs are rendered only at independent renderers which do not typically sell their product to any reputable pet food manufacturer. ”

        True I guess, BUT read the part where the owner of Valley proteins while stating there were two separate lines;

        “…one for clean meat and bones and a second line for dead pets and wildlife. However, Smith reported, “the protein material is a mix from both production lines. Thus the meat and bone meal made at the plant includes materials from pets and wildlife, and about five percent of that product goes to dry-pet-food manufacturers….”

        So while he kept the processing separate, in hte end the “protein material”- the meat and bone meal came from BOTH lines and about 5% of that went to pet food manufacturers.

        “the independent renderers I spoke to told me that they sell their product to the companies that make fertilizer or fish feed that is used in Asia to feed fish raised on fish farms. Think about that the next time you eat fish.”

        Fertilizer is used on American farms too, it would not surprise me in the least some of that winds up on farm fields here. I don’t eat fish but I get your point.

        Reply

        • I am very familiar with Valley Proteins. They have the contract with LA county to dispose of the pets from animal shelters.

          It is my fervent hope that pet food companies avoid buying rendered pets for fear of the discovery of sodium pentobarbital in their product. But do they? Yes. As evidence by the Smucker’s, Evangers, and Ol’ Roy recent scandals of the discovery of pentobarbital in their pet food. They claim it comes from euthanized cattle, pigs and/or chickens. Consumers don’t believe it, nor should they.

          But, we can hope that everytime there is a new scandal it makes the pet food industry that much more cautious. It seems only reasonable considering the economic impact of a such a discovery.

          Yes, fertilizers are used on most crops grown today. To my knowledge no one is testing fertilizer for pentobarbital. I feel another scandal brewing…And a lot more reading to do. The USDA has a number of articles on the subject of fertilization of crops.

          Reply

  29. Informative and dissapointing! If anyone is looking for a homemade alternative but unsure what the appropriate nutrition needs to be I used ‘Canine Life’ which is a base that you mix with your protein and veg from a recommended list and then bake. Very successful with my 13 year old girl.

    Reply

      • I have been using frisky canned food particularly in the salmon and white fish categories

        Reply

    • These dog foods are NEVER okay. Read the ingredient panel, do your research. They’re disgusting. Have been for years!

      Reply

    • I’ve been feeding the multi generation family owned Fromm dry food after reading and a lot of research, including the dogfoodadvisor site reviews. It is the ONLY pet food compay that NEVER had a recall until last year with one variety of canned food that had more vitamin D in it than it should have.
      Never any recalls for ecoli, listeria, slamonella, plastic contamination, toxic mold, or anything else.
      The alternative is cook it all yourself, but in my case with four St Bernards and working full time that ISNT going to happen! I have had dogs who lived to be 13 years old, VERY few issues of any kind, in fact one I have is now 12 years and 1 month old, the only health issue she’s had is some front teeth needed to be removed.

      Of all the feeds out there I trust Fromm, I have fed IAMS, Show results and many other premium brands over the years, but this one is I feel at the top.

      Reply

        • Well then I guess if you are going to run me down and slam me for feeding my dogs anything other than home made steaks- I have nothing further to add and I’m unsubscribing, I’ll continue feeding the Fromm, bye!

          Reply

          • I’m sorry you feel that way. But, I do not recommend Fromm. I prefer a human-edible pet food. And I did not suggest steaks. Not many people have the time, and the resources to make a home made diet. That’s why I seldom make that recommendation. For people who can do that for their babies I think it’s wonderful. You cook for yourself why not cook for your fur kids – if you can?

          • IAMS uses by products.
            Merrick hasn’t. Had recalls; the lust human grade ingredients, USA product and unless they changed; user their own processing plant in USA which is very rare

  30. Would you please read the article. It’s not phenobarbital, it’s pentobarbital! There is a difference! One is a euthanasia drug another a sedative.

    Reply

    • Either one should not be in pet food ! Why do they have to add drugs to pet food ? This is why I make a lot of my pet food and when I buy pet food it is from a reliable pet food store. Too much preservatives in most pet food !

      Reply

      • Pet food manufacturers do not intentionally add the drug it is introduced into the market by renderers who accept animals that were euthanized using pentobarbital. Pet food companies unwittingly buy the meat meal or animal fat and do not test the ingredients for drugs. Ultimately, it is the manufacturer’s responsibility to do so. When they don’t these things happen.

        Reply

        • Well, just the ones people have suggested so far. But, yes, you have a point. Unfortunately, most commercial pet food on the market is not something I feel comfortable recommending; Which is why I won’t do “pet food reviews”, there are only a handful of companies that meet my standards. And even those companies make mistakes.

          Ideally, I would like to see people make their own food for their pets. I believe if people can cook for their family they can cook for their furkids.

          My disapproval of most pet food suggestions is a not an overstatement. It is not born of prejudice but of knowledge about what is legally allowed to be in pet food. Indeed, if you knew what I do, you would wonder why I recommend any of them.

          Reply

          • What do you ha e to say about Merrick brand? I have a German wire haired pointer who is an allergy pup, he does well on the limited ingredient grain free chicken variety. He is 2 with no signs of allergy now that we got him squared away on much better ( in my opinion) food.

          • Well, I really hate to say because I haven’t researched that brand.

            But in general, I’m not a fan of traditional pet food. What I mean to say is that pet food contains feed grade ingredients and pet food is made to feed grade standards and regulations. Whereas a human food grade/pet food is held to an entirely different set of standards and laws.

            That is why I always recommend human edible pet food. And yes, they do exist. Just make sure it is made in a human food facility otherwise it’s probably just be marketing baloney.

            I hope I’ve answered your question. Let me know if you need more help! :)

          • Because it is made to pet food standards and not human food standards I cannot recommend it. Here’s what Nature’s Variety says, “our manufacturing facilities are used to produce pet food rather than human food, and since this is not in line with the USDA’s definition of human grade, our foods cannot be classified as being human grade.”

      • My tuxedo cat I’m about 8 years old has been diagnosed with bladder stones. The vet suggested Royal Canin urinary tract can food and suggested this may crystallize the stones. First Heidi devoured it and is now shying away from it a bit and has had a tendency to throw up quite often and they are not hairballs just regurgitated food

        Reply

  31. This article states that the drug can only come from euthanasized animals. This is wrong. If that is the case how does my dog take phenobarbital daily to control his epilepsy

    Reply

  32. Phenobarbital is a sedative…only in extremely large dosages is it used in euthanasia. I am not saying that ANY amount is acceptable in pet food, I’m just saying that the article is misleading when it says that phenobarbital is a death drug.

    Reply

    • Sodium pentobarbital is the drug used to euthanize pets. If the drug is found in a pet food it can cause significant health problems and death in pets. Pets have become seriously ill and some have died from eating contaminated pet food. Look it up. It was all over the news. The article was written using an FDA source – it is not misleading.

      Reply

  33. I don’t see a date at the top of the page as to when this was published..You start off by saying “Today……”.. When was “today” ? I just came here from a post in FB thinking it was recent. Any chance you can put dates at the top Mollie?
    You’re doing an awesome job… still <3

    Reply

    • All my posts are dated – they are at the bottom of every post. I believe the article was written on February 18, 2018. To move the dates to the top would mean changing the code of my theme.

      Reply

  34. I feed the Old Roy Kibble dog food to my dog’s is that contaminated as well I also feed Milk Bones to my dogs so if you could please tell me which ones are recalled that would be great to know thank you

    Reply

    • The article mentioned the canned Ol’ Roy dog food and it was found nearly a year ago.

      My advice?

      Choose another brand of dog food. Ol’ Roy is one of the lowest quality dog foods on the market. The lowest. If you care about your dog – which I’m sure you do, stop feeding it Ol’ Roy and Milk Bones. That food is just garbage. Check out http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com for reviews of dog food. I don’t do reviews.

      That the best I can do.

      Hope I was able to help.

      Reply

      • My dogs on raw food obtained from My butcher. Together with some fruit and veg. All rescued. Two Cavaliers now 13 years old and fit and healthy.

        Reply

        • Any supplements to make it a complete diet? I’m trying to cook for my dogs, but one has cancer and I’m trying to cut out the carbs. But keep it balanced if I can.

          Reply

          • I would feel more comfortable if you consult with a veterinary nutritionist. Alternatively, your vet might suggest BalanceIT. Or you could read Dr. Jean Hofve’s recommendations or read Dr. Lisa Pierson’s work.

            When my cats had cancer my holistic vet who worked in conjunction with BalanceIT to provide me an appropriate diet for my cats using bison meat. Additionally, there were other treatments that went beyond their diet.

            Therefore, I cannot say enough about getting a good holistic vet! They will have much better advice than me. I’m just a blogger with no professional training. But thanks for asking! :)

      • Have you ever tried giving ANSWERS raw pet food to your dogs? It is expensive, but in my opinion, the best. Snd my dogs love it!

        Reply

        • I was sent a sample of Answers, but I can’t buy it locally and shipping it is out of the question for financial reasons. While I hesitate to recommend a raw food I was particularly drawn to them because of their animal welfare standards. As a vegan, making these decisions is agonizing as my cats are obligate carnivores. So, I am always mindful of where and how those animals lived before they were killed.

          As a pet food safety expert, I understand the risks and benefits of feeding raw. It has to be personal decision one that I would never recommend unless someone completely understood the risks inherent in raw meat. Therefore I highly recommend consumers read my piece on raw pet food before making a decision:

          Reply

  35. why are they using euthanized animals in the dog food processes any way what i would like to know are they using animals from shelters or where they are getting them

    Reply

    • Because it’s cheap.

      The source of the material is likely from a renderer who accepts animals who may have been euthanized. Typically it is horses. One of the largest renderers on the East coast accepts horses that may have been euthanized.

      Currently, there is no method for tracking horses that have been euthanized.

      This is not the first time nor will it be the last time this happens. Put in my search box Evanger’s and Smucker’s – that should give you an idea of the scope of the problem.

      Reply

      • Usually euthanasia has to be done by a vet. The only ones that can be tracked are the registered and tattooed horses. They have to be reported as deceased to the registry. The renderer also accepts horses are cattle, etc., that are full of all kinds of other drugs too. I know because I work on a big racing farm. So another words, 99.99% of animals picked up by renderers are full of different kinds of drugs and going into pet food. All the pet food companies know this. They don’t care.

        Reply

        • Yes, good point! Thank you for reminding me. But all the other horses are not tracked. Many are picked up by dead animal haulers and taken to renderers. There is no quick and easy method for a dead animal hauler or a renderer to determine if the animal was euthanized with a drug. The FDA is currently working on a system to prevent this kind of thing from happening. But until such time, consumers should be concerned. All we can hope is that manufacturers are not buying product from renderers that take animals from dead animal haulers. And if they do, they should test their product before using it in a pet food.

          Reply

      • When I had no choice but to euthanize my horse the vet told me ahead of time he wouldn’t come until we had dug the grave. Which we did. The drug was called Succumb. He said it was very dangerous if any animals ingested it. This was in Central Ky.

        Reply

        • That’s great you had a good vet. Yes, it is extremely dangerous for scavengers to eat the carcasses. Most of the time it is preferable that they are buried, but dead animal haulers will come and remove dead horses. I know of one that picks them up from the University of Pennsylvania veterinary school and delivers them to Darling Industries. I have reported the matter to the authorities so hopefully, that practice will be discontinued.

          Reply

  36. I have a half of a case of the kibbles n bits that’s been recalled. My dogs already ate the other half. Who do I get in touch with?

    Reply

  37. I just lost my small Chihuahua I was feeding him some of the Ol Roy canned dog food mixed with Beneful could this possibly have been the cause of his death he started bleeding from the rectum and they could not save him

    Reply

    • Bad part is.. Legally they are only required to reimburse you for the cost of your dogs(you have to show a receipt), the cost of the food (must show receipt), & the cost of your vet bill (& you have to show a receipt for that). Oh & they can deduct for the age of the dog(s) if they are senior dogs. They don’t have to pay a damn thing that will even put a dent in their pocketbooks. I have looked this up because I had 6 cats & a dog die from tainted food.

      Reply

  38. i don’t think we should be feeding our pets their own brothers & sisters ( killed cats & dogs) anyway! that’s like saying all the homeless people be rendered into whatever you get my point! that maybe why peoples pets are sick all the time. not saying everyone should do it but i feed raw , there is a disease from eating people called prion or ( Kuru ) disease . maybe there is something similar for pets too! anyway i don’t feed the brains of any animal to my pets or me.

    Reply

  39. Pingback: Smucker's Withdraws More Pet Food Amid Deadly Drug Dog Food Scandal; Additional Skippy Lots and Ol' Roy Dog Treats Named | Poisoned Pets | Pet Food Safety News

  40. Not condoning in any way but offering insight into how some of these things can happen. Smucker’s may have a decent audit program. They may have pentobarbital specifically spelled out on the raw material specifications. The raw material providers may provide COAs that say the material is tested and met the specification. Or, at any time, any one of the links in the chain can become weak. Industry likes to constantly become more efficient in order to continue to offer product at low prices while still making a profit. This results in things like less training. The supplier auditing program may have inexperienced people performing the routine visits. Or maybe the visits aren’t so routine anymore, and are just desk audits in which the reviewer/approver is really at the mercy of what is being told to them by the documentation. Efficiency efforts can lead to skip lot testing (raw material provider OR the purchasing company may decide to skip lot test). They RM provider may still provide a COA stating that the material meets specification for pentobarbital, but with a caveat that it’s based on statistical analysis of some portion of testing over the previous X number of lots or years, etc. Plus, how far in the chain does the expectation for supplier controls reach? The manufacturer certainly is expected to audit the raw material suppliers. But the RM supplier, the renderer’s…are they expected to audit the shelters? Are there any controls on the renderer’s at all – do they have rules that they cannot use, for instance, road kill? My point is, the purchaser is not always privy to all of the efficiency short cuts that are being taken at the RM provider’s facility. Likewise, the manufacturer of the pet food may be taking efficiency shortcuts. The fact that this was identified 29 years ago and is still happening says that there is a lack of commitment, follow through, and monitoring. Further, lack of oversight by the FDA may be a very large contributing factor. Whether or not that is due to political reasons and lack of funding is a different conversation.

    Reply

  41. This is why we don’t feed commercial pet food anymore. I don’t trust the manufactures one iota. We were feeding a refrigerated high quality commercial food to our lab pups and after many months of feeding it, one began to throw up after each meal. It got to the point where he would even turn his nose away from his bowl and not eat. Who knows why one became sick and one didn’t. The smell of it had changed and it wasn’t appealing. And manufacturers can change the ingredients at any time without telling you. We now homemake the same food with quality human-grade ingredients and add the BalanceIT vitamins and minerals. The pups who are now almost two years old are thriving and are all solid muscle. Also, they are at a perfect weight. We also have our cats on BalanceIT. They no longer have health issues. They were allergic to many of the ingredients in commercial pet food. BalanceIT was designed by Board Certified Veterinarian nutritionists and you can get recipes on their website based on the weight of your pet(s). Cornell University said it’s the most hypoallergenic supplement on the market. And they’re right. With the cats, I was at my wits end. I could not find any canned commercial pet food that didn’t cause skin issues. Or, one that wouldn’t worsen my female’s asthma. Also, my female couldn’t handle a raw diet either. Nor human vitamins added to a home cooked diet. I tried everything. With trial and error and elimination diets, and patience like you wouldn’t believe, I know what works for them and what doesn’t. Thank God for BalanceIT —we will NEVER feed commercial food again. Also, we had extensive blood work done all the fur kids and their numbers came back with flying colors. No deficiencies whatsoever as some manufacturers would lead you to believe. “Oh don’t feed a homemade diet—it’s dangerous”. BLAH BLAH BLAH! Homemade diets work as long as they are done right. And after living with pets for almost 50 years, I can certainly see the difference it makes.

    And Mollie, thank God for you and all the hard work and sacrifice you do. And for exposing these manufacturers when they do wrong. It takes courage to do what you do. Please continue to be a voice for our beloved pets.

    Reply

    • I make all my Dogs and Cats food, I boil down a entire chicken, debone it, process it with unflavored gelatin. Then add canned Macarel fish, and barley. Some cooked veggies, some blueberries, or Apples. Both my 3 cats and my dogs eat this. They are extremely healthy. My diabetic cats blood sugar is way down. They no longer have bad breath. Or Shed so terrible.I cook the chicken till the bones are almost broken down.

      Reply

      • Good for you Dorothy!!! I would consider making sure your recipes are formulated to feed to cats and dogs. And don’t just get your recipes off some unreliable website. There is so much crap information out there. I recommend Dr. Lisa Pierson and Dr. Jean Hofve for the best information on home formulations. Just making sure! :)

        Reply

    • CrazyCatLady.. .
      What homemade ingredients do you use?
      We have home raised pork and beef, but even store bought chicken can be debatable on how it was fed and raised.
      Really would love a better option then trusting our pets food won’t have problems.
      Please share details on your homemade recipe or site link that gives that info. Thanks!

      Reply

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