Milo’s Kitchen Treats Recalled After Dogs Became Sick, Excess Thyroid Blamed

The J.M. Smucker Company (the same company that made the tainted Gravy Train dog food) announced a recall of Milo’s Kitchen dog treats after the FDA told them that dogs became ill because the products contain elevated levels of beef thyroid hormone.

According to the recall notice, “Dogs consuming high levels of beef thyroid hormone may exhibit symptoms such as increased thirst and urination, weight loss, increased heart rate and restlessness. These symptoms may resolve when the consumption of these levels is discontinued. However, with prolonged consumption, these symptoms may increase in severity and may include vomiting, diarrhea, and rapid or labored breathing. Should these symptoms occur, we recommend pet owners contact their veterinarian immediately.”

Diet-related hyperthyroidism in dogs is unusual and can be life-threatening if not treated.

RECALLED PRODUCT

The recalled treats include the following Milo’s Kitchen dog treat products and lots:

Product Description UPC Code Product Size Best If Used By Date
Milo’s Kitchen Steak Grillers / Steak Grillers Recipe with Angus Steak 0 7910051822 7
0 7910051822 7
0 7910051823 4
0 7910052776 2
18 oz. bag
18 oz. bag
22 oz. bag
10 oz. bag
11/15/2018
4/26/2019
4/26/2019
4/26/2019
Milo’s Kitchen Grilled Burger Bites with Sweet Potato and Bacon 0 7910052126 5 15 oz. bag 11/19/2018

The FDA informed Smucker’s of dog’s illness reports and Smucker’s initiated a recall of the contaminated product, and the recall is being conducted in cooperation with the agency.

THE PROBLEM

According to the FDA, dog treats with elevated thyroid hormone levels, “likely contains animal gullets (laryngeal tissue) in which the thyroid glands were not completely removed. USDA prohibits the use of thyroid glands and laryngeal muscle tissue for human food.

If a thyroid gland is not completely removed from animal gullets and then those gullets are then used to make the dog treats, any remaining thyroid tissue would most likely be the source of thyroid hormones. The FDA tells pet food companies, “to avoid the use of livestock gullets.”

HOW SMUCKER’S FAILED

Smucker’s should have taken steps to ensure that they were receiving raw materials and ingredients that did not contain thyroid hormone secreting tissue. But they didn’t. Hopefully, now they are taking a closer look at their products and practices, so things like this don’t happen again.

MISLEADING ADVERTISING

The problem with both of these products is not just that they have excess amounts of thyroid hormone, but that the product contains thyroid glands from cattle. However, you will not find thyroid glands on the ingredient list, because they aren’t supposed to be there. Ever. Checking the ingredients won’t help you as both products simply tell you that they contain “beef.”

Here’s the problem with Milo’s advertising: Looking at the images of grilled steak and juicy chunks of prime sirloin steak on the package below, would consumers have any idea the product contained thyroid glands and not pure beef?

recalled Milo's steak treats

recalled Milo's steak treats

WHAT TO DO IF YOU A PROBLEM

If you believe your pet has become ill from consuming a pet food, please provide the FDA with valuable information by reporting it electronically through their Safety Reporting Portal or call your local FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator.

If you and your veterinarian think a pet food or treat is the source of a problem – save it – because your state agricultural or veterinary diagnostic lab may want to do testing. If you need more help, find out how to report a pet food complaint to the FDA.

CONTACT SMUCKER’S

Consumers who have purchased the specific lots of product listed above should stop feeding it to their dogs. If consumers have questions they should call the company at 1-888-569-6767, Monday through Friday, between 9:00 AM and 5:00 PM EST or email them by completing this form.

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Mollie Morrissette

Mollie Morrissette, author of Poisoned Pets, is an animal food safety expert and advisor to AAFCO. Help support her work by making a donation today.

Comments (5) Write a comment

  1. I posted here about Milo treats a few weeks ago. My golden retriever passed away 04/13/2018. He was my best friend and gave me so much happiness. It was horrible seeing him so sick. What shocked me is that they still sell this product. I truly believe that because I gave him these treats for such a long time and he showed all these symptoms this is what shortened his life after paying hundreds of dollars in pet bills They could not tell me it was the treats nor could they tell me what was wrong with him. He died after going into convolutions and throwing up. He was in so much pain I had to let him go. I knew one day he would pass but not in pain like this.

    Reply

    • I am so sorry for your loss. I wish the vets could have given you some idea why he died otherwise you’re left not knowing what the cause was or even if it had anything to do with something you fed him. Did the vet diagnose him with hyperthyroidism at least?

      Reply

      • Nope. Just couldn’t figure it out. He got better then I found him in convulsions and throwing up. He was in horrific pain.

        Reply

        • Oh Kat, how simply horrific. I am so sorry. Was the vet ever able to diagnose your dog with hyperthyroidism? Because that would point to the treats for that illness. However, without a veterinary diagnosis – a conclusion or even the assumption it might have been food related – the reason for your dog’s death will never be known. I’m so sorry for your loss.

          Reply

          • Thank you for your sympathy. I appreciate it. Is it true that as soon as I stopped giving him the Milo treats that the poop it out and there should be no evidence in their blood work? That’s what I was told. But I feel since I gave these to him s long period of time the side affects would still be there. He became anemic from diarrhea.

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