Blue Ridge Beef Recalls Raw Pet Food Following Kitten Deaths

Another raw pet food is being recalled. This time it’s for a raw kitten food made by Blue Ridge Beef because of its contamination with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes after the FDA received a complaint of two kitten deaths, including one death which was confirmed to be caused by Salmonella septicemia. Subsequent testing by the FDA of Kitten Grind Lot #GA1102 revealed the presence of Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes.

According to the company, the recalled product is for a lot that contains 20 cases or 300 chubs of product that was distributed in the following states: Texas, Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee and North Carolina.

The affected product is sold in two-pound chubs that are frozen and are distinguished by the manufacturing codes: Kitten Grind, Lot #GA1102 with a manufacturing date of 11/02/2017.

This recall is being made with the knowledge of the FDA.

THE DANGER OF SALMONELLA + LISTERIA

Salmonella and Listeria can cause severe and potentially fatal infection in both the animals consuming the pet food and the humans that handle the pet food.  There is a risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surface exposed to these products. Pets can be carriers of the bacteria and infect humans, even if the pets do not appear to be ill. Once Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes gets established in the pet’s gastrointestinal tract, the animal can shed the bacteria when it has a bowel movement, and the contamination will continue to spread.

Groups at high risk for Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes include the elderly, people with weakened immune systems and certain chronic medical conditions (such as cancer), and pregnant women.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes should monitor themselves and their pets for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.

Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product or pets that have consumed this product should contact their healthcare provider. Pet owners should contact a veterinarian if their pet shows symptoms.

WHAT CONSUMERS SHOULD DO

Those who have purchased the above lot of Kitten Grind are urged to stop feeding them the recalled food immediately. Those with questions can contact the company through their website or email the company at blueridgebeefga@yahoo.com.

REPORTING PET FOOD COMPLAINTS

If you believe your pet has become ill from consuming a pet food, please provide the FDA with valuable information by reporting it electronically through their Safety Reporting Portal or to your local FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator. In addition to your contact information, your pet’s symptoms, and medical records, and the lot number of the pet food product. If you think the food is the source of a problem, save a sample. Depending on the type of testing you want, your state agricultural or veterinary diagnostic lab may conduct the testing. If you need more help, find out how to report a pet food complaint to the FDA.

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Mollie Morrissette

Mollie Morrissette, author of Poisoned Pets, is an animal food safety expert and advisor to AAFCO. Help support her work by making a donation today.

Comments (5) Write a comment

  1. So Karen, am I suppose to do a chemical and biological examination of the various cat feeds, before I select a brand to feed to my cats? If the manufacturer doesn’t list “poison” on the ingredient label, then how are we to know?

    Reply

    • Excellent comment. I would suggest however, that you have a better chance of getting a better quality pet food if it is made in a human food facility. All you have to do is ask them if it made to human grade standards or not. And while your at it – ask them to provide you with their latest tests screening for pathogens. If they can’t give you one…go elsewhere for your pet food.

      Reply

  2. I’m glad I can’t afford Blue Ridge pet “feed.” Calling it food is ridiculous. So? What dollar value can we put on our little, loved companions when Blue Ridge pet food kills them? The company should offer some compensation.

    Reply

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